Addressing the Risks and Realities of Womanhood During the HIV Epidemic in a Gender Perspective

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163962
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Addressing the Risks and Realities of Womanhood During the HIV Epidemic in a Gender Perspective
Author(s):
Johny, Silpa
Author Details:
Silpa Johny, Research Scholar, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram, Dindigul, Tamil Nadu, India, email: silpajohny@yahoo.co.in
Abstract:
Introduction: The lives of women and men, their work, income, roles and the relationships they share are all shaped by social norms and traditions that treat women and men differently. We live in a world where gender matters and being a woman is a health risk. Gender can be conceptualized as a powerful social determinant of health, which interacts with other determinants such as age, family structure, income, education, social support and a variety of behavioral determinants. Usually women's health needs are of lower priority within the structure of patriarchy than those for children and men. Women are viewed first as mothers or future mothers, whereas men's health never conceptualized from a family or father perspective. India, home for 5.1 million HIV infected people, second largest in the world, where women constitute a major part. On most societies, the rule governing sexual relationships differ for women and men, with men holding most of the power. This means that for many women, including married women, their male partner's sexual behaviour is the most important HIV risk factor. Purpose: To analyze risks and realities of women with HIV through empirical findings, which have collected through case studies in Kerala, India, revealing social indicators of a developed country. Results: In India, men account for 77% AIDS and women 23% (a ratio of 3:1). Survey shows that 90% of women living with HIV have only had one sexual partner in their lives. Who is responsible for these situation- innocent victims? The culture of silence that surrounds sex that dictates that 'good women' are expected to be ignorant about sex and be passive, makes it difficult for them to be pro-active in negotiating safer sex, and accessing treatment and services for sexually transmitted diseases.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAddressing the Risks and Realities of Womanhood During the HIV Epidemic in a Gender Perspectiveen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohny, Silpaen_US
dc.author.detailsSilpa Johny, Research Scholar, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram, Dindigul, Tamil Nadu, India, email: silpajohny@yahoo.co.inen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163962-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The lives of women and men, their work, income, roles and the relationships they share are all shaped by social norms and traditions that treat women and men differently. We live in a world where gender matters and being a woman is a health risk. Gender can be conceptualized as a powerful social determinant of health, which interacts with other determinants such as age, family structure, income, education, social support and a variety of behavioral determinants. Usually women's health needs are of lower priority within the structure of patriarchy than those for children and men. Women are viewed first as mothers or future mothers, whereas men's health never conceptualized from a family or father perspective. India, home for 5.1 million HIV infected people, second largest in the world, where women constitute a major part. On most societies, the rule governing sexual relationships differ for women and men, with men holding most of the power. This means that for many women, including married women, their male partner's sexual behaviour is the most important HIV risk factor. Purpose: To analyze risks and realities of women with HIV through empirical findings, which have collected through case studies in Kerala, India, revealing social indicators of a developed country. Results: In India, men account for 77% AIDS and women 23% (a ratio of 3:1). Survey shows that 90% of women living with HIV have only had one sexual partner in their lives. Who is responsible for these situation- innocent victims? The culture of silence that surrounds sex that dictates that 'good women' are expected to be ignorant about sex and be passive, makes it difficult for them to be pro-active in negotiating safer sex, and accessing treatment and services for sexually transmitted diseases.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:41Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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