2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163963
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Survey of Nursing Students Concerning Premenstrual Syndrome
Author(s):
Kajihara, Kyoko; Tomiyasu, Toshiko
Author Details:
Kyoko Kajihara, Teacher, St. Mary's Junior College, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan, email: kajihara@st-mary.ac.jp; Toshiko Tomiyasu
Abstract:
Purpose: Premenstrual syndrome (hereafter referred to as PMS) is said to be both a physical and mental condition. It is also believed that it can be recognized and controlled by those suffering from it. At our college, as there is a difference in the level of understanding of PMS between second and third year students, the latter having studied it in the motherhood nursing class, we believe there might be a difference in their level of self-care. Those contents of lectures can then be adapted to help students understand their conditions and assist them in their lives as students. Method: Junior College's second and third year students were given questionnaires about PMS between April 1 and May 31, 2005 concerning the presence of physical and psychological symptoms, charges in food cravings, self-care methods, and stress. Results and Conclusion: We compared the pre-instruction second year students (N-2 group) with the post-instruction third year students (N-3 group), with 87% of the N-3 group and 10% of the N-2 group replying that they knew about PMS. Both groups described having abdominal pain, a depressed mood, and a craving for sweet food. For self-care methods, both groups said they took medication to relieve the physical pain, but did nothing but endure the mental symptoms. Regarding daily living, most of the N-3 group said that they did nothing differently, while the N-2 group stated that they exercised a little. Concerning meals, the N-3 group tried to lower their sugar and caffeine intake. Both groups claimed an increase in stress level in home and school life, and that they commonly took it out on their parents and friends. This study found that there is no difference in symptoms or treatment measures between the pre- and post-instruction groups. These days anyone can look up information to settle their worries. Therefore, we believe that as teachers, we must use our specialized knowledge and guidance to help students naturally adopt adequate measures to assist themselves in daily life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSurvey of Nursing Students Concerning Premenstrual Syndromeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKajihara, Kyokoen_US
dc.contributor.authorTomiyasu, Toshikoen_US
dc.author.detailsKyoko Kajihara, Teacher, St. Mary's Junior College, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan, email: kajihara@st-mary.ac.jp; Toshiko Tomiyasuen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163963-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Premenstrual syndrome (hereafter referred to as PMS) is said to be both a physical and mental condition. It is also believed that it can be recognized and controlled by those suffering from it. At our college, as there is a difference in the level of understanding of PMS between second and third year students, the latter having studied it in the motherhood nursing class, we believe there might be a difference in their level of self-care. Those contents of lectures can then be adapted to help students understand their conditions and assist them in their lives as students. Method: Junior College's second and third year students were given questionnaires about PMS between April 1 and May 31, 2005 concerning the presence of physical and psychological symptoms, charges in food cravings, self-care methods, and stress. Results and Conclusion: We compared the pre-instruction second year students (N-2 group) with the post-instruction third year students (N-3 group), with 87% of the N-3 group and 10% of the N-2 group replying that they knew about PMS. Both groups described having abdominal pain, a depressed mood, and a craving for sweet food. For self-care methods, both groups said they took medication to relieve the physical pain, but did nothing but endure the mental symptoms. Regarding daily living, most of the N-3 group said that they did nothing differently, while the N-2 group stated that they exercised a little. Concerning meals, the N-3 group tried to lower their sugar and caffeine intake. Both groups claimed an increase in stress level in home and school life, and that they commonly took it out on their parents and friends. This study found that there is no difference in symptoms or treatment measures between the pre- and post-instruction groups. These days anyone can look up information to settle their worries. Therefore, we believe that as teachers, we must use our specialized knowledge and guidance to help students naturally adopt adequate measures to assist themselves in daily life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:42Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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