2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163969
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
South Asian Women - Victims of Traditions and Male Domination
Author(s):
Khan, Ikram
Author Details:
Ikram Khan, Faculty Member, University of Central Punjab, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan, email: khan212pk@yahoo.com
Abstract:
South Asian women remain powerless, exploited and subservient in male dominated society. Children and women are poorest; and the deprived population of this region suffer from illiteracy, domestic violence, sexual assault, and malnourishment. The trafficking of women has become a lucrative business resulting in HIV spread, abortions, beatings, murder, resale, rape etc. Women are victims of century-old traditions and customs like Karo-kari (honor killing). Discrimination against women is not only prevalent among ruler/lower classes but also among the urban, educated, westernized elite. Powerful feudal lords do not allow their daughters to go outside their villages and they are given only basic religious education, while their sons are educated in big cities and are allowed to party, drink and even womanize. Woman are generally considered a burden, slaves and subservient to men. Women will not be free until they are empowered with education, i.e., specific policies and laws, and with awareness, economic opportunities, and role models. Purpose: To analyze the problems faced by women and children in South Asia and suggest measures for their resolution. Low literacy rate seem to be the route cause of many problems. Educational opportunities can help women break the shackles and exalt their status in male dominated society. Forceful legislation and sincere implementation of laws against various forms of oppression against women and children are needed. To bring about attitude change in relation to women's status, vigorous campaigns through revision of curricula, media and legislation should be launched. The women of South Asia cannot be expected to struggle alone against the forces of discrimination, exploitation and manipulation. Their problems are all pervading and need to be addressed accordingly with a systems approach. These hypotheses are being tested through overt and covert research followed by analysis, evaluation and recommendations to arrive at measures to solve these problems. This presentation will provide an overview, as well as the qualitative findings, from an initial survey in Pakistan concerning the causes and extent of the problem.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSouth Asian Women - Victims of Traditions and Male Dominationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Ikramen_US
dc.author.detailsIkram Khan, Faculty Member, University of Central Punjab, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan, email: khan212pk@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163969-
dc.description.abstractSouth Asian women remain powerless, exploited and subservient in male dominated society. Children and women are poorest; and the deprived population of this region suffer from illiteracy, domestic violence, sexual assault, and malnourishment. The trafficking of women has become a lucrative business resulting in HIV spread, abortions, beatings, murder, resale, rape etc. Women are victims of century-old traditions and customs like Karo-kari (honor killing). Discrimination against women is not only prevalent among ruler/lower classes but also among the urban, educated, westernized elite. Powerful feudal lords do not allow their daughters to go outside their villages and they are given only basic religious education, while their sons are educated in big cities and are allowed to party, drink and even womanize. Woman are generally considered a burden, slaves and subservient to men. Women will not be free until they are empowered with education, i.e., specific policies and laws, and with awareness, economic opportunities, and role models. Purpose: To analyze the problems faced by women and children in South Asia and suggest measures for their resolution. Low literacy rate seem to be the route cause of many problems. Educational opportunities can help women break the shackles and exalt their status in male dominated society. Forceful legislation and sincere implementation of laws against various forms of oppression against women and children are needed. To bring about attitude change in relation to women's status, vigorous campaigns through revision of curricula, media and legislation should be launched. The women of South Asia cannot be expected to struggle alone against the forces of discrimination, exploitation and manipulation. Their problems are all pervading and need to be addressed accordingly with a systems approach. These hypotheses are being tested through overt and covert research followed by analysis, evaluation and recommendations to arrive at measures to solve these problems. This presentation will provide an overview, as well as the qualitative findings, from an initial survey in Pakistan concerning the causes and extent of the problem.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:48Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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