2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163970
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Arsenic Toxicity Scenario and WHO initiative in Bangladesh
Author(s):
Khandker, Salamat
Author Details:
Salamat Khandker, PhD, Medical Officer, World Health Organization (WHO), Bangladesh, email: drsalamatuk@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Background: About half of the total population of Bangladesh is consuming arsenic through drinking water; and more than 30,000 people have already developed arsenicosis. This number will increase drastically within the next several decades if necessary measures are not taken; as will the number of cancers caused by arsenic. While there is still no specific treatment, some authors have claimed that vitamins A, C, E, zinc, selenium or spirulina are effective in treating arsenicosis. The present study was conducted to evaluate whether spirulina extract plus zinc is effective in treating arsenicosis. Methods: Forty-one patients with arsenicosis at Muradnagar Upazilla of Comilla District were randomly treated orally with either placebo (17 patients) or spirulina extract (24 patients) 250 mg b.d. for 16 weeks. The effectiveness of spirulina was evaluated by comparing changes in skin manifestations, clinical scores, and total arsenic contents in spotted urine and hair; between placebo- and spirulina extract-treated groups. Each patient was supplied with arsenic-free drinking water by installing a simple water filter in the household. The total arsenic concentrations of their drinking water (before and after filtration) and spotted urine were estimated every fortnightly to assess the arsenic-free drinking water and excretion of arsenic in urine. Hair was collected both before and after completing the treatment. Results: The average concentrations of arsenic in the water of placebo- and spirulina extract-treated groups before filtration were 150.1 and 161.7 g/l. Their spotted urine contained on average 72.1 and 78.4 g/l respectively. The Shapla filter was found to be effective in reducing the arsenic level of tubewell water to 9.7 g/l (93.8% removal of arsenic). After two weeks of administering arsenic-free water, the amount of arsenic excreted in spotted urine was reduced significantly (18.4 g/l in placebo group and 21.6 g/l in spirulina extract-treated group). Administration of spirulina extract caused a sharp increase in urinary excretion of arsenic (138 g/l) at 4 weeks and continued for another weeks. Spirulina extract had no adverse effect that required physician's attention and improved the clinical condition. In the placebo-treated group, the mean total clinical scores before and after treatment were 13.0 and 11.1 respectively. In spirulina extract-treated group, the mean total clinical scores before and after treatment were 13.7 and 6.2 respectively. Among the 17 patients treated with placebo, only 4 patients (23.5%) showed clinical improvement. On the other hand, out of 24 patients treated with spirulina, 17 patients (70.8%) showed improvement in clinical conditions. Spirulina caused 47.09% removal of arsenic in hair. Conclusions: Results show that spirulina extract (250 mg) with zinc (2 mg) twice daily for 16 weeks may be useful for the treatment of arsenicosis with skin manifestations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleArsenic Toxicity Scenario and WHO initiative in Bangladeshen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKhandker, Salamaten_US
dc.author.detailsSalamat Khandker, PhD, Medical Officer, World Health Organization (WHO), Bangladesh, email: drsalamatuk@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163970-
dc.description.abstractBackground: About half of the total population of Bangladesh is consuming arsenic through drinking water; and more than 30,000 people have already developed arsenicosis. This number will increase drastically within the next several decades if necessary measures are not taken; as will the number of cancers caused by arsenic. While there is still no specific treatment, some authors have claimed that vitamins A, C, E, zinc, selenium or spirulina are effective in treating arsenicosis. The present study was conducted to evaluate whether spirulina extract plus zinc is effective in treating arsenicosis. Methods: Forty-one patients with arsenicosis at Muradnagar Upazilla of Comilla District were randomly treated orally with either placebo (17 patients) or spirulina extract (24 patients) 250 mg b.d. for 16 weeks. The effectiveness of spirulina was evaluated by comparing changes in skin manifestations, clinical scores, and total arsenic contents in spotted urine and hair; between placebo- and spirulina extract-treated groups. Each patient was supplied with arsenic-free drinking water by installing a simple water filter in the household. The total arsenic concentrations of their drinking water (before and after filtration) and spotted urine were estimated every fortnightly to assess the arsenic-free drinking water and excretion of arsenic in urine. Hair was collected both before and after completing the treatment. Results: The average concentrations of arsenic in the water of placebo- and spirulina extract-treated groups before filtration were 150.1 and 161.7 g/l. Their spotted urine contained on average 72.1 and 78.4 g/l respectively. The Shapla filter was found to be effective in reducing the arsenic level of tubewell water to 9.7 g/l (93.8% removal of arsenic). After two weeks of administering arsenic-free water, the amount of arsenic excreted in spotted urine was reduced significantly (18.4 g/l in placebo group and 21.6 g/l in spirulina extract-treated group). Administration of spirulina extract caused a sharp increase in urinary excretion of arsenic (138 g/l) at 4 weeks and continued for another weeks. Spirulina extract had no adverse effect that required physician's attention and improved the clinical condition. In the placebo-treated group, the mean total clinical scores before and after treatment were 13.0 and 11.1 respectively. In spirulina extract-treated group, the mean total clinical scores before and after treatment were 13.7 and 6.2 respectively. Among the 17 patients treated with placebo, only 4 patients (23.5%) showed clinical improvement. On the other hand, out of 24 patients treated with spirulina, 17 patients (70.8%) showed improvement in clinical conditions. Spirulina caused 47.09% removal of arsenic in hair. Conclusions: Results show that spirulina extract (250 mg) with zinc (2 mg) twice daily for 16 weeks may be useful for the treatment of arsenicosis with skin manifestations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:49Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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