Sweden and the United Kingdom: Lessons Learned From Two European Union Members

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163974
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sweden and the United Kingdom: Lessons Learned From Two European Union Members
Author(s):
Kinney, Elizabeth; Shen, Lei; Warren, Ben; Armstrong, Robert; Bobinski, Mary Anne; Spiegel, Jerry; MacLeod, Stuart; Cooke, Karen
Author Details:
Elizabeth Kinney, Graduate Student - Masters in Law, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: e.kinney@shaw.ca; Lei Shen; Ben Warren; Dr. Robert Armstrong; Mary Anne Bobinski; Dr. Jerry Spiegel; Dr. Stuart MacLeod; Karen
Abstract:
Introduction: Negative health effects resulting from exposure to environmental agents (EAs) are disproportionately evident in children and young adults. Due to increased international attention to this issue, Health Canada funded the study, How selected OECD countries govern environmental health threats to children. The purpose of this project was to review and evaluate governmental policies and regulations, as well as influential non-governmental actions, in selected Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries, to identify effective means of reducing children's exposure to EAs. Two European Union (EU) nations, Sweden and the United Kingdom, provide divergent views of the European approach to reducing exposure to harmful EAs. Goals and Objectives: The primary objective of the assessment of Sweden and the United Kingdom was to compare approaches to children's environmental health within two EU member states. It was important to note those European level government instruments (GIs) that take into account children's vulnerabilities to environmental exposure that have been implemented at the national level. The unique political, legislative, and socioeconomic traits of each nation should be considered in accounting for differences in this area. Method: The first step was to review publications, legislation, regulations, and other government instruments through legal databases, government reports, and academic research. This was followed by in-person and telephone interviews with government officials and academics. Evaluation: Action taken at the European level in this field has exceeded that taken in North America. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Environment Agency (EEA) have directly addressed the issues of environmental health, and, in particular, that which affects the child. However, Sweden has utilized national surveys, annual reviews, and environmental objectives to further the protection of all vulnerable populations from EAs. This approach is fostered by a long history of environmental protection and strong child welfare advocacy by the government. The success of Sweden in this field lies not in legislation but in broad information dissemination. Within the United Kingdom, there has been a piecemeal approach to children's environmental health. Individual researchers and regional governmental bodies within the UK have advanced progress in the area.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSweden and the United Kingdom: Lessons Learned From Two European Union Membersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKinney, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Leien_US
dc.contributor.authorWarren, Benen_US
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorBobinski, Mary Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpiegel, Jerryen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacLeod, Stuarten_US
dc.contributor.authorCooke, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Kinney, Graduate Student - Masters in Law, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, email: e.kinney@shaw.ca; Lei Shen; Ben Warren; Dr. Robert Armstrong; Mary Anne Bobinski; Dr. Jerry Spiegel; Dr. Stuart MacLeod; Karenen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163974-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Negative health effects resulting from exposure to environmental agents (EAs) are disproportionately evident in children and young adults. Due to increased international attention to this issue, Health Canada funded the study, How selected OECD countries govern environmental health threats to children. The purpose of this project was to review and evaluate governmental policies and regulations, as well as influential non-governmental actions, in selected Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries, to identify effective means of reducing children's exposure to EAs. Two European Union (EU) nations, Sweden and the United Kingdom, provide divergent views of the European approach to reducing exposure to harmful EAs. Goals and Objectives: The primary objective of the assessment of Sweden and the United Kingdom was to compare approaches to children's environmental health within two EU member states. It was important to note those European level government instruments (GIs) that take into account children's vulnerabilities to environmental exposure that have been implemented at the national level. The unique political, legislative, and socioeconomic traits of each nation should be considered in accounting for differences in this area. Method: The first step was to review publications, legislation, regulations, and other government instruments through legal databases, government reports, and academic research. This was followed by in-person and telephone interviews with government officials and academics. Evaluation: Action taken at the European level in this field has exceeded that taken in North America. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Environment Agency (EEA) have directly addressed the issues of environmental health, and, in particular, that which affects the child. However, Sweden has utilized national surveys, annual reviews, and environmental objectives to further the protection of all vulnerable populations from EAs. This approach is fostered by a long history of environmental protection and strong child welfare advocacy by the government. The success of Sweden in this field lies not in legislation but in broad information dissemination. Within the United Kingdom, there has been a piecemeal approach to children's environmental health. Individual researchers and regional governmental bodies within the UK have advanced progress in the area.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:54Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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