The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Bangladesh: Probable routes of entry, spread and its prevention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163977
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Bangladesh: Probable routes of entry, spread and its prevention
Author(s):
Larson, Charles; Khanum, Rasheda; Gazi, Rukhsana; Haseen, Fariha
Author Details:
Charles Larson, MDCM, MSc Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Acting Director, Health Systems and Infectious Diseases Division (HSID), International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research: Centre for Health and Population Research (ICDDR, B), Health Systems and Infectious Diseases Division, Mohakhali, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: charles.larson@staff.mcgill.ca; Rasheda Khanum; Rukhsana Gazi; Fariha Haseen
Abstract:
Purpose/Background: The global HIV/AIDS pandemic has not yet spread into the general population of Bangladesh. The reasons for this are multiple, but none are likely sufficient to block its eventual introduction. Bangladesh has traditionally been a highly conservative society intolerant of premarital sex. This view continues to prevail, but recent surveys indicate the reality is not consistent with such expectations of sexual fidelity. In particular, among youth high sexual practices are commonly occurring within an environment of secrecy and multiple misconceptions. This workshop will share with participants what is being done to plan and implement HIV/AIDS prevention strategies in Bangladesh and the research being carried out to support this. Design/Results: Studies to be presented include 1) National Youth Survey: A total 12,729 youth were interviewed from 360 randomly selected primary sampling units (PSUs) in rural and urban areas of Bangladesh. Awareness of HIV, the epidemic and the preventive role of condoms was found to be high males and females throughout the country. On the other hand, many misconceptions related to transmission and prevention of HIV/AIDS were identified. By the age of 21 nearly one-third of unmarried males are sexually active, with half starting before age 18. Condom use is low and access among unmarried youth very restricted. 2) Migrant workers: This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of HIV/AIDS risk behaviours among married men and women who have lived apart due to the husbands' work-migration. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in two rural areas of Bangladesh where over 20% of men are migrant workers. Married men who had lived apart from their wives in Bangladesh or abroad were 5-6 times more likely to report extra-marital sex. Men were 2-3 times more likely to have had sex with a sex worker while they were away than before living away. Less than one-third of the men interviewed had ever used a condom. Migrant male workers represent a high risk group for the introduction of HIV/AIDS into the general population. 3) Female sex workers: A national HIV surveillance system includes all brothels in Bangladesh and selected sites for street and hotel sex workers. HIV infection prevalence is low (<1%), whereas syphilis rates were high. The median age at first sex is around 14 years. Many of the sex workers are married or have regular partners. Anal sex with both new and regular clients was reported by all groups of sex workers. Overall, consistent condom use in all groups was very low. Violence (both beating and rape) was commonly reported. Most of the sex workers who were involved in interventions in the last year said this involvement helped in changing their behaviours.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe HIV/AIDS epidemic in Bangladesh: Probable routes of entry, spread and its preventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.authorKhanum, Rashedaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGazi, Rukhsanaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHaseen, Farihaen_US
dc.author.detailsCharles Larson, MDCM, MSc Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Acting Director, Health Systems and Infectious Diseases Division (HSID), International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research: Centre for Health and Population Research (ICDDR, B), Health Systems and Infectious Diseases Division, Mohakhali, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: charles.larson@staff.mcgill.ca; Rasheda Khanum; Rukhsana Gazi; Fariha Haseenen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163977-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Background: The global HIV/AIDS pandemic has not yet spread into the general population of Bangladesh. The reasons for this are multiple, but none are likely sufficient to block its eventual introduction. Bangladesh has traditionally been a highly conservative society intolerant of premarital sex. This view continues to prevail, but recent surveys indicate the reality is not consistent with such expectations of sexual fidelity. In particular, among youth high sexual practices are commonly occurring within an environment of secrecy and multiple misconceptions. This workshop will share with participants what is being done to plan and implement HIV/AIDS prevention strategies in Bangladesh and the research being carried out to support this. Design/Results: Studies to be presented include 1) National Youth Survey: A total 12,729 youth were interviewed from 360 randomly selected primary sampling units (PSUs) in rural and urban areas of Bangladesh. Awareness of HIV, the epidemic and the preventive role of condoms was found to be high males and females throughout the country. On the other hand, many misconceptions related to transmission and prevention of HIV/AIDS were identified. By the age of 21 nearly one-third of unmarried males are sexually active, with half starting before age 18. Condom use is low and access among unmarried youth very restricted. 2) Migrant workers: This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of HIV/AIDS risk behaviours among married men and women who have lived apart due to the husbands' work-migration. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in two rural areas of Bangladesh where over 20% of men are migrant workers. Married men who had lived apart from their wives in Bangladesh or abroad were 5-6 times more likely to report extra-marital sex. Men were 2-3 times more likely to have had sex with a sex worker while they were away than before living away. Less than one-third of the men interviewed had ever used a condom. Migrant male workers represent a high risk group for the introduction of HIV/AIDS into the general population. 3) Female sex workers: A national HIV surveillance system includes all brothels in Bangladesh and selected sites for street and hotel sex workers. HIV infection prevalence is low (<1%), whereas syphilis rates were high. The median age at first sex is around 14 years. Many of the sex workers are married or have regular partners. Anal sex with both new and regular clients was reported by all groups of sex workers. Overall, consistent condom use in all groups was very low. Violence (both beating and rape) was commonly reported. Most of the sex workers who were involved in interventions in the last year said this involvement helped in changing their behaviours.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:57Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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