The Impact of Exogenous Variation in Family Size on Women's Labor Force Participation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163978
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Exogenous Variation in Family Size on Women's Labor Force Participation
Author(s):
Lopez de Lerida, Jimena
Author Details:
Jimena Lopez de Lerida, Assistant Professor, Departamento de Economia Agraria, Facultad de Agronomia e Ingenieria Forestal, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile, email: jlopezde@uc.cl
Abstract:
Purpose: To estimate the effect of fertility on mothers' labor force participation. Background: Each additional child increases the quantity of childcare activities, raising the marginal value of time at home. Thus, having children may induce some women to reduce their hours of work, find less demanding occupations or leave the labor force entirely. Method: I use survey data from Chile to estimate the effect of fertility on mothers' labor force participation. Exogenous variability in family size is used to correct for the unobserved heterogeneity and the endogeneity biases that arise in this context. The instruments considered are multiple births and the sex composition of previous children. One limitation of this identification strategy is that it cannot be used to study the impact of the first child on mother's employment, even though its impact may be the largest. Results and Significance: Results suggest that additional children do affect women's labor participation: while simple probit and linear probability models confirm that fertility has a significant negative impact on women's labor force participation, once IV controls are included in the model specification the adverse impact of an extra child on women's labor force participation remains only for adding the second child.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Exogenous Variation in Family Size on Women's Labor Force Participationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLopez de Lerida, Jimenaen_US
dc.author.detailsJimena Lopez de Lerida, Assistant Professor, Departamento de Economia Agraria, Facultad de Agronomia e Ingenieria Forestal, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile, email: jlopezde@uc.clen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163978-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To estimate the effect of fertility on mothers' labor force participation. Background: Each additional child increases the quantity of childcare activities, raising the marginal value of time at home. Thus, having children may induce some women to reduce their hours of work, find less demanding occupations or leave the labor force entirely. Method: I use survey data from Chile to estimate the effect of fertility on mothers' labor force participation. Exogenous variability in family size is used to correct for the unobserved heterogeneity and the endogeneity biases that arise in this context. The instruments considered are multiple births and the sex composition of previous children. One limitation of this identification strategy is that it cannot be used to study the impact of the first child on mother's employment, even though its impact may be the largest. Results and Significance: Results suggest that additional children do affect women's labor participation: while simple probit and linear probability models confirm that fertility has a significant negative impact on women's labor force participation, once IV controls are included in the model specification the adverse impact of an extra child on women's labor force participation remains only for adding the second child.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:58Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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