Empowering Women and Children- the Key to Unblocking the MDG challenges

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163979
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empowering Women and Children- the Key to Unblocking the MDG challenges
Author(s):
Lotse, Cecilia
Author Details:
Cecilia Lotse, Regional Director, South Asia, UNICEF, Lekhnath Marg, Kathmandu, Nepal, email: gkoehler@unicef.org
Abstract:
Purpose: To address gender discrimination as a key vector in social exclusion, which in South Asia is compounded by poverty, caste, ethnicity and location. Background: Data on South Asia - Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka - documents gross gender disparities at the national, and even more starkly at local levels. Girls' education and women's literacy, infant and child mortality, and maternal mortality are among the lowest levels globally. Design: This paper will focus on responses to gender-based social exclusion, recommending six axes of action, all of which hinge on human rights and empowerment: 1) Human rights, and notably the right of the child, need to be established and realized as the core values on which to base and judge human development. While better quality and equitable health and education of women and girls and society as a whole boost economic performance and political stability, these are human rights and need to be delivered even if there were no positive economic and political spillovers. 2) Since governments are the primary providers of social services, political will and policy capacity are prerequisite to upgrading and fundamentally changing conditions in the delivery of health, education, welfare and protection. In South Asia, the commitment is manifest in governments' and the region's commitment to the MDGs and ratification of most relevant international conventions. 3) Several South Asian countries make sound allocations of financial resources to the social sector; in others, such resources need considerable augmenting, which is all the more warranted since the economies are growing rapidly and technology is at a high level. 4) Evidence suggests that it is the systemic and deeply ingrained process of social exclusion which is the key impediment to achieving the MDGs and notably gender equity. Actual delivery of social services, in terms of accessibility and appropriateness, needs to change. 5) Girls' education is a pivot point in this process and the paper will highlight some of the approaches to enhancing the accessibility and appropriateness of formal and non-formal education for girls and their comparative success in countries of the region. 6) Empowerment and participation are ultimately the guarantors of progress in all the above areas: the empowerment of women and children is seen as the key to influencing policies, assuring sufficient resources and better service delivery, and to overcome social exclusion. Conclusion: The paper will close with examples of empowerment of women and children, drawing on UNICEF's insights into the rich experience in the region.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpowering Women and Children- the Key to Unblocking the MDG challengesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLotse, Ceciliaen_US
dc.author.detailsCecilia Lotse, Regional Director, South Asia, UNICEF, Lekhnath Marg, Kathmandu, Nepal, email: gkoehler@unicef.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163979-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To address gender discrimination as a key vector in social exclusion, which in South Asia is compounded by poverty, caste, ethnicity and location. Background: Data on South Asia - Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka - documents gross gender disparities at the national, and even more starkly at local levels. Girls' education and women's literacy, infant and child mortality, and maternal mortality are among the lowest levels globally. Design: This paper will focus on responses to gender-based social exclusion, recommending six axes of action, all of which hinge on human rights and empowerment: 1) Human rights, and notably the right of the child, need to be established and realized as the core values on which to base and judge human development. While better quality and equitable health and education of women and girls and society as a whole boost economic performance and political stability, these are human rights and need to be delivered even if there were no positive economic and political spillovers. 2) Since governments are the primary providers of social services, political will and policy capacity are prerequisite to upgrading and fundamentally changing conditions in the delivery of health, education, welfare and protection. In South Asia, the commitment is manifest in governments' and the region's commitment to the MDGs and ratification of most relevant international conventions. 3) Several South Asian countries make sound allocations of financial resources to the social sector; in others, such resources need considerable augmenting, which is all the more warranted since the economies are growing rapidly and technology is at a high level. 4) Evidence suggests that it is the systemic and deeply ingrained process of social exclusion which is the key impediment to achieving the MDGs and notably gender equity. Actual delivery of social services, in terms of accessibility and appropriateness, needs to change. 5) Girls' education is a pivot point in this process and the paper will highlight some of the approaches to enhancing the accessibility and appropriateness of formal and non-formal education for girls and their comparative success in countries of the region. 6) Empowerment and participation are ultimately the guarantors of progress in all the above areas: the empowerment of women and children is seen as the key to influencing policies, assuring sufficient resources and better service delivery, and to overcome social exclusion. Conclusion: The paper will close with examples of empowerment of women and children, drawing on UNICEF's insights into the rich experience in the region.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:35:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:35:59Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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