2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163986
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Three Million Newbord Deaths Annually
Author(s):
Mason, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Mason, Director, Child and Adolescent Health Department, World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland, email: masone@who.int
Abstract:
Background: Newborn deaths account for approximately 40% of the mortality in children. The two-thirds reduction in child mortality required for the achievement of Millennium Development Goal 4 by 2015 will not be achieved without substantially reducing these deaths. Preventing three million newborn deaths annually is feasible. Interventions are available and success is possible even in settings with high mortality and weak health systems. Where the health system is weak, interventions delivered at the family and community levels and through outreach services can promote early initiation of exclusive breastfeeding, keeping newborns warm, adequate hygiene and identifying and promptly seeking care for management of newborn infections. But even high coverage with such interventions can only reduce newborn mortality by up to one-third. The additional scaling up of coverage with clinical care is challenging but will be essential if optimal and equitable impact is to be achieved. To be most effective, interventions must provide continuity of care along two axes: from pregnancy to childhood; from within the family to the health facility. Action needs to start now if the necessary progress in preventing mortality is to be achieved by 2015. The first step at country level is to assess the situation and create a policy environment conducive to improved newborn health. The next step is to optimize newborn care within the current constraints and opportunities. Integrating improved delivery of newborn care into existing strategies such as Making Pregnancy Safer and Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) will reduce deaths at a low marginal cost. Success requires systematically strengthening both the demand and supply sides. IMCI has now been adapted to include care in the first week of life at the health facility level - and to promote specific newborn care services, such as home visits in the first week of life by community health workers, as part of community-IMCI efforts. Political will, commitment to action and increased accountability at national and international levels are essential to making this effort successful and turning the prevention of three million newborn deaths annually from promise into reality.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThree Million Newbord Deaths Annuallyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMason, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Mason, Director, Child and Adolescent Health Department, World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland, email: masone@who.inten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163986-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Newborn deaths account for approximately 40% of the mortality in children. The two-thirds reduction in child mortality required for the achievement of Millennium Development Goal 4 by 2015 will not be achieved without substantially reducing these deaths. Preventing three million newborn deaths annually is feasible. Interventions are available and success is possible even in settings with high mortality and weak health systems. Where the health system is weak, interventions delivered at the family and community levels and through outreach services can promote early initiation of exclusive breastfeeding, keeping newborns warm, adequate hygiene and identifying and promptly seeking care for management of newborn infections. But even high coverage with such interventions can only reduce newborn mortality by up to one-third. The additional scaling up of coverage with clinical care is challenging but will be essential if optimal and equitable impact is to be achieved. To be most effective, interventions must provide continuity of care along two axes: from pregnancy to childhood; from within the family to the health facility. Action needs to start now if the necessary progress in preventing mortality is to be achieved by 2015. The first step at country level is to assess the situation and create a policy environment conducive to improved newborn health. The next step is to optimize newborn care within the current constraints and opportunities. Integrating improved delivery of newborn care into existing strategies such as Making Pregnancy Safer and Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) will reduce deaths at a low marginal cost. Success requires systematically strengthening both the demand and supply sides. IMCI has now been adapted to include care in the first week of life at the health facility level - and to promote specific newborn care services, such as home visits in the first week of life by community health workers, as part of community-IMCI efforts. Political will, commitment to action and increased accountability at national and international levels are essential to making this effort successful and turning the prevention of three million newborn deaths annually from promise into reality.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:07Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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