Low Birth Weight of the Children: Does Public Health Programs matter in India?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163987
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Low Birth Weight of the Children: Does Public Health Programs matter in India?
Author(s):
Mathiyazhgan, Maathai K
Author Details:
Maathai K. Mathiyazhgan, Research Fellow (Health Economist), Institute of South Asian Studies, Singapore, Singapore, email: isasmkm@nus.edu.sg
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine the impact of public health programs on low birth weights of newborns in India, and policy concerns this engenders. Background: Low Birth Weight (LBW) is defined as a birth weight of less than 2, 5000 grams. Studies demonstrate that children are born small as a result of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). IUGR is also attributable to small maternal size at conception (low weight and short stature) and low gestational weight gain (or energy intake during pregnancy). The public health programs like various nutrition interventions play a vital role in curbing children's LBW situation in India. There have been no studies to show the role of public health programs on the low birth weight of children in India. Design: The data was drawn from the Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) - Rapid Household Survey (RHS) conducted in India, during 1998-99. The sample covered 4, 74, 463 currently married women in the reproductive age group of 15-44 years. For the analysis purpose, the latest births to mothers in the last three years period were considered. This paper uses Probit Model to asses the effects of the public health programs in averting low birth weights of newborn in India. It also considers other socio-economic variables along with public health programs' intervention in the low birth weight of the children in India. The paper recognizes the heterogeneity between the independent variables of the model and accordingly the robust estimations of the Probit Model have been carried out. The paper focuses on the State level analysis of public health programs in relation to the alleviation of low birth weights of children. It also discusses the experiences of the structure and financial provisions of public health programs in the State. Results: Results reveal that nearly 20% of the newborn babies had low birth weights in India. This varies significant across the different States in India. The lowest LBW was reported in Nagaland State, with 3.8% and the highest in West Bengal State with 22.1%. Furthermore, the results show that public health programs had a negative relationship with LBW of the newborn in India. It implies that a 1% change in the general level of public health programs leads to a 90% decrease in the probability of getting LBW babies in India. Conclusion: As LBW proportion is high in India, the government's action is pertinent in ensuring the minimum levels of public health programs at State level in India. It would increase the maternal health care services and access to ICDS programs like nutrition, pre and post natal health care programs. These are close correlates of the low birth weight of the newborns in India. The policy actions to ensure an equal balance of ICDS programs could promote healthy newborns in India. This paper provides guidelines for the policy framework to reduce LBW of newborn babies in India.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLow Birth Weight of the Children: Does Public Health Programs matter in India?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMathiyazhgan, Maathai Ken_US
dc.author.detailsMaathai K. Mathiyazhgan, Research Fellow (Health Economist), Institute of South Asian Studies, Singapore, Singapore, email: isasmkm@nus.edu.sgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163987-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the impact of public health programs on low birth weights of newborns in India, and policy concerns this engenders. Background: Low Birth Weight (LBW) is defined as a birth weight of less than 2, 5000 grams. Studies demonstrate that children are born small as a result of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). IUGR is also attributable to small maternal size at conception (low weight and short stature) and low gestational weight gain (or energy intake during pregnancy). The public health programs like various nutrition interventions play a vital role in curbing children's LBW situation in India. There have been no studies to show the role of public health programs on the low birth weight of children in India. Design: The data was drawn from the Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) - Rapid Household Survey (RHS) conducted in India, during 1998-99. The sample covered 4, 74, 463 currently married women in the reproductive age group of 15-44 years. For the analysis purpose, the latest births to mothers in the last three years period were considered. This paper uses Probit Model to asses the effects of the public health programs in averting low birth weights of newborn in India. It also considers other socio-economic variables along with public health programs' intervention in the low birth weight of the children in India. The paper recognizes the heterogeneity between the independent variables of the model and accordingly the robust estimations of the Probit Model have been carried out. The paper focuses on the State level analysis of public health programs in relation to the alleviation of low birth weights of children. It also discusses the experiences of the structure and financial provisions of public health programs in the State. Results: Results reveal that nearly 20% of the newborn babies had low birth weights in India. This varies significant across the different States in India. The lowest LBW was reported in Nagaland State, with 3.8% and the highest in West Bengal State with 22.1%. Furthermore, the results show that public health programs had a negative relationship with LBW of the newborn in India. It implies that a 1% change in the general level of public health programs leads to a 90% decrease in the probability of getting LBW babies in India. Conclusion: As LBW proportion is high in India, the government's action is pertinent in ensuring the minimum levels of public health programs at State level in India. It would increase the maternal health care services and access to ICDS programs like nutrition, pre and post natal health care programs. These are close correlates of the low birth weight of the newborns in India. The policy actions to ensure an equal balance of ICDS programs could promote healthy newborns in India. This paper provides guidelines for the policy framework to reduce LBW of newborn babies in India.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:08Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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