2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163993
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Related Behaviours of Sudanese Adolescents
Author(s):
Moukhyer, Mohamed
Author Details:
Mohamed Moukhyer, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs, School of Medicine, Ahfad University for Women, Omdurman, Khartoum, Sudan, email: moukhyer@hotmail.com
Abstract:
Purpose: To better understand and gain new insight into the health behaviours, lifestyles and the contexts of adolescents in order to assess the determinants and barriers to improve health related behaviours. Background: Adolescence is the period (10-19 years) during which lifestyle patterns of behaviours are being formed. These behaviours set the stage for future health problems. Behaviours and lifestyle are determinants of future health, illness, disability, and premature mortality. Design: This is a cross sectional descriptive study. Random samples of 1200 adolescents within the age group 10-19 years (53.2% girls and 46.8% boys) were interviewed. Results: The overall prevalence of smoking among adolescents is 4.9 %. More boys (9.1%) than girls (1.3%) report to smoke. Older participants report more tobacco use, as well as those with higher levels of education. Consumption of alcohol is significantly more common for boys (2.3%). More boys than girls report to be actively engaged in sport activities; inactivity is significantly higher amongst older age groups and is associated with a lack of education. 58% of girls are physically inactive. More than half of the boys go hungry because there is not enough available food in the house; this is somewhat less common for girls (43%). Adolescents above 16 years of age report significantly less consumption of nutritious food (healthy eating) than non-nutritious food (unhealthy eating) than other age groups. Conclusion: Our research contributed to a greater understanding of current health related behaviours among Sudanese adolescents. A number of implications (e.g. hunger experience and physical inactivity for girls) for interventions arise from the findings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Related Behaviours of Sudanese Adolescentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoukhyer, Mohameden_US
dc.author.detailsMohamed Moukhyer, Vice Dean for Academic Affairs, School of Medicine, Ahfad University for Women, Omdurman, Khartoum, Sudan, email: moukhyer@hotmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163993-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To better understand and gain new insight into the health behaviours, lifestyles and the contexts of adolescents in order to assess the determinants and barriers to improve health related behaviours. Background: Adolescence is the period (10-19 years) during which lifestyle patterns of behaviours are being formed. These behaviours set the stage for future health problems. Behaviours and lifestyle are determinants of future health, illness, disability, and premature mortality. Design: This is a cross sectional descriptive study. Random samples of 1200 adolescents within the age group 10-19 years (53.2% girls and 46.8% boys) were interviewed. Results: The overall prevalence of smoking among adolescents is 4.9 %. More boys (9.1%) than girls (1.3%) report to smoke. Older participants report more tobacco use, as well as those with higher levels of education. Consumption of alcohol is significantly more common for boys (2.3%). More boys than girls report to be actively engaged in sport activities; inactivity is significantly higher amongst older age groups and is associated with a lack of education. 58% of girls are physically inactive. More than half of the boys go hungry because there is not enough available food in the house; this is somewhat less common for girls (43%). Adolescents above 16 years of age report significantly less consumption of nutritious food (healthy eating) than non-nutritious food (unhealthy eating) than other age groups. Conclusion: Our research contributed to a greater understanding of current health related behaviours among Sudanese adolescents. A number of implications (e.g. hunger experience and physical inactivity for girls) for interventions arise from the findings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:14Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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