2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163994
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Negative Aspects of Child Labour: A Bangladeshi Perspective
Author(s):
Muhammad, Niaz Makhdum
Author Details:
Niaz Makhdum Muhammad, Lecturer, State University of Bangladesh, Dhanmondi, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: nmakhdum@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Purpose: To address important issues regarding the negative impacts of child labour on those who were supposed to go to school regularly, and enjoy the love and affection of their parents at their tender age. Background: In any society, working children are the most disadvantaged of all socio-economic groups, since they are forced to work for a living, sacrificing their childhood as well as their future for their survival and that of their families. Bangladesh is the home of 6.8 million working children, accounting for more than 6 percent of the world's total working child population, which numbers 122 million. Design: An independent study was conducted to look into the mental and physical conditions of child labourers. 40 children aged 9-12 years, working in garments, bakeries and confectionaries, hotels and restaurants, cigarette and blade factories and some small engineering workshops were directly interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. All of the respondents were residents of the city of Dhaka. Results: From this study it was found that the early involvement of children in work leads to a number of harmful health and developmental consequences. Working children suffer significant growth deficits as compared with school-going children. They grow up shorter and lighter, and their body size continues to be smaller even in adulthood. Child workers also tend to develop muscular, chest and abdominal pains, headaches, dizziness, respiratory infections and diarrhea because of poor working conditions. These poor working conditions make them more susceptible to infectious diseases, injuries and other workplace-related ailments. Many even experience amputations or loss of body parts. These children want to go to schools, but most of the time they are not allowed to do so. This results in their inability to keep pace with the modern world. Conclusion: Child labor is a denial of the right to enjoy childhood and achieve full physical and psychological development. The government and civil society in general should immediately come forward to formulate a comprehensive National Plan of Action aimed at the gradual elimination of child labor from the country.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNegative Aspects of Child Labour: A Bangladeshi Perspectiveen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMuhammad, Niaz Makhdumen_US
dc.author.detailsNiaz Makhdum Muhammad, Lecturer, State University of Bangladesh, Dhanmondi, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: nmakhdum@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163994-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To address important issues regarding the negative impacts of child labour on those who were supposed to go to school regularly, and enjoy the love and affection of their parents at their tender age. Background: In any society, working children are the most disadvantaged of all socio-economic groups, since they are forced to work for a living, sacrificing their childhood as well as their future for their survival and that of their families. Bangladesh is the home of 6.8 million working children, accounting for more than 6 percent of the world's total working child population, which numbers 122 million. Design: An independent study was conducted to look into the mental and physical conditions of child labourers. 40 children aged 9-12 years, working in garments, bakeries and confectionaries, hotels and restaurants, cigarette and blade factories and some small engineering workshops were directly interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. All of the respondents were residents of the city of Dhaka. Results: From this study it was found that the early involvement of children in work leads to a number of harmful health and developmental consequences. Working children suffer significant growth deficits as compared with school-going children. They grow up shorter and lighter, and their body size continues to be smaller even in adulthood. Child workers also tend to develop muscular, chest and abdominal pains, headaches, dizziness, respiratory infections and diarrhea because of poor working conditions. These poor working conditions make them more susceptible to infectious diseases, injuries and other workplace-related ailments. Many even experience amputations or loss of body parts. These children want to go to schools, but most of the time they are not allowed to do so. This results in their inability to keep pace with the modern world. Conclusion: Child labor is a denial of the right to enjoy childhood and achieve full physical and psychological development. The government and civil society in general should immediately come forward to formulate a comprehensive National Plan of Action aimed at the gradual elimination of child labor from the country.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:15Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.