Psychological Impact of Terrorist Attacks on Children: Bangladesh Context

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163995
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychological Impact of Terrorist Attacks on Children: Bangladesh Context
Author(s):
Muhammad, Niaz Makhdum
Author Details:
Niaz Makhdum Muhammad, Lecturer, State University of Bangladesh, Dhanmondi, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: nmakhdum@yahoo.com
Abstract:
Purpose: To address certain issues regarding the negative psychological impact of terrorist attacks on children. Background: The recent tragic acts of terrorism are unprecedented in Bangladesh. Children may be confused or frightened by the news and will look to adults for information and guidance on how to react. Design: Parents of 67 children aged 5-11 years, living in different areas of Dhaka city, were directly interviewed to obtain their reactions about the psychological effect of different terrorist attacks on their children. A standard open-ended questionnaire was prepared for this purpose. Results: It was found that when terrorist attacks occur, children may witness or learn about these events by watching TV, talking with people at school, or overhearing adults discussing the events. There is a wide range of emotional, behavioral, and physiological reactions that children may display following a terrorist attack. 64% of parents reported that their children had at least one stress symptom and more than 85% reported that their children were worried about their own safety or the safety of a loved one. Some common reactions that children displayed as consequences of terrorist attacks included nightmares and other sleep disturbances, anxieties about death, helplessness and passivity, lack of usual responsiveness, general fear, cognitive confusion, difficulty talking about event, lack of verbalization, somatic symptoms (e.g., stomach aches, headaches), startled responses to loud or unusual noises, fussiness, uncharacteristic crying, and neediness, aggressive behavior and angry outbursts, avoiding school and the loss of the ability to concentrate at school lowering their academic performance. Conclusion: Terrorism is designed to make people afraid. Because children have limited information, skills and experiences they are likely to feel especially frightened. Parents can make the biggest difference in helping their children recover successfully by staying close to their children, limiting the amount their children watch these events on television and maintaining a normal routine. When the threat is ongoing, it is a challenge for the community to give children a sense of security, which would enable them to trust others and make plans for their future.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychological Impact of Terrorist Attacks on Children: Bangladesh Contexten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMuhammad, Niaz Makhdumen_US
dc.author.detailsNiaz Makhdum Muhammad, Lecturer, State University of Bangladesh, Dhanmondi, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: nmakhdum@yahoo.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163995-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To address certain issues regarding the negative psychological impact of terrorist attacks on children. Background: The recent tragic acts of terrorism are unprecedented in Bangladesh. Children may be confused or frightened by the news and will look to adults for information and guidance on how to react. Design: Parents of 67 children aged 5-11 years, living in different areas of Dhaka city, were directly interviewed to obtain their reactions about the psychological effect of different terrorist attacks on their children. A standard open-ended questionnaire was prepared for this purpose. Results: It was found that when terrorist attacks occur, children may witness or learn about these events by watching TV, talking with people at school, or overhearing adults discussing the events. There is a wide range of emotional, behavioral, and physiological reactions that children may display following a terrorist attack. 64% of parents reported that their children had at least one stress symptom and more than 85% reported that their children were worried about their own safety or the safety of a loved one. Some common reactions that children displayed as consequences of terrorist attacks included nightmares and other sleep disturbances, anxieties about death, helplessness and passivity, lack of usual responsiveness, general fear, cognitive confusion, difficulty talking about event, lack of verbalization, somatic symptoms (e.g., stomach aches, headaches), startled responses to loud or unusual noises, fussiness, uncharacteristic crying, and neediness, aggressive behavior and angry outbursts, avoiding school and the loss of the ability to concentrate at school lowering their academic performance. Conclusion: Terrorism is designed to make people afraid. Because children have limited information, skills and experiences they are likely to feel especially frightened. Parents can make the biggest difference in helping their children recover successfully by staying close to their children, limiting the amount their children watch these events on television and maintaining a normal routine. When the threat is ongoing, it is a challenge for the community to give children a sense of security, which would enable them to trust others and make plans for their future.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:16Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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