2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163996
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Child Abuse in Kenyan slums: The good, the bad and the ugly
Author(s):
Mumah, Solomon J.; Kigen, Edward M.; Muga, Richard O.; Ruhigisha, Joy P.; Munyana, Gertrude F. K.
Author Details:
Solomon J. Mumah, Lecturer, Department of Psychology, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya, email: scjmumah@yahoo.ca; Edward M. Kigen; Richard O. Muga; Joy P. Ruhigisha; Gertrude F.K. Munyana
Abstract:
Child abuse depicts anything that individuals, institutions or processes do (or fail to do), which directly or indirectly harms the child or damages her/his prospects of safe growth and healthy development. At the apex of this ill is Kenya, among other nations, that has since seen an unprecedented increase in cases of child abuse manifested in child battering, sexual abuse, child labour, verbal insults, child neglect, denial of physical and emotional needs, confinements and a legion other forms of assault. In recognition of this problem, this study was conducted to ascertain the incidents of child abuse within Kenya's urban informal settlements. The descriptive survey employed ex-post facto and comparative research designs to gather data from boys and girls in Kawangware slums of Nairobi city, using the questionnaire as the main tool for primary data collection. Data were analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively and reported descriptively. Results indicate that Kenyan children are extensively abused. This was evidenced by established cases of verbal assault (68%), beatings (95%), inflicting of pain involving the child's sexual organ (35%), excessive labour (33.5%), incest and sexual abuse (46%) and denial of food (22.5%). Others included abandonment (18%), confinement (13.5%) and stigmatisation and discrimination (97%), just to mention a few. Orphans and destitute children were worst victims. Such abuses have resulted in regular nightmares, withdrawal, disturbed sleep, burns, multiple bruises and marks, fractures and bald spots on the abused children. Mothers (and/or female guardians) were the worst perpetrators of child abuse followed by fathers (and/or male guardians) and close family relatives and friends. Our research calls for programmes that address responsible parenthood in the slums. But where is Kenya when such evils are committed against her children, four years after publishing the Children's Act, 2001?
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChild Abuse in Kenyan slums: The good, the bad and the uglyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMumah, Solomon J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKigen, Edward M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMuga, Richard O.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRuhigisha, Joy P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMunyana, Gertrude F. K.en_US
dc.author.detailsSolomon J. Mumah, Lecturer, Department of Psychology, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya, email: scjmumah@yahoo.ca; Edward M. Kigen; Richard O. Muga; Joy P. Ruhigisha; Gertrude F.K. Munyanaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163996-
dc.description.abstractChild abuse depicts anything that individuals, institutions or processes do (or fail to do), which directly or indirectly harms the child or damages her/his prospects of safe growth and healthy development. At the apex of this ill is Kenya, among other nations, that has since seen an unprecedented increase in cases of child abuse manifested in child battering, sexual abuse, child labour, verbal insults, child neglect, denial of physical and emotional needs, confinements and a legion other forms of assault. In recognition of this problem, this study was conducted to ascertain the incidents of child abuse within Kenya's urban informal settlements. The descriptive survey employed ex-post facto and comparative research designs to gather data from boys and girls in Kawangware slums of Nairobi city, using the questionnaire as the main tool for primary data collection. Data were analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively and reported descriptively. Results indicate that Kenyan children are extensively abused. This was evidenced by established cases of verbal assault (68%), beatings (95%), inflicting of pain involving the child's sexual organ (35%), excessive labour (33.5%), incest and sexual abuse (46%) and denial of food (22.5%). Others included abandonment (18%), confinement (13.5%) and stigmatisation and discrimination (97%), just to mention a few. Orphans and destitute children were worst victims. Such abuses have resulted in regular nightmares, withdrawal, disturbed sleep, burns, multiple bruises and marks, fractures and bald spots on the abused children. Mothers (and/or female guardians) were the worst perpetrators of child abuse followed by fathers (and/or male guardians) and close family relatives and friends. Our research calls for programmes that address responsible parenthood in the slums. But where is Kenya when such evils are committed against her children, four years after publishing the Children's Act, 2001?en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:17Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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