2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163997
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Psychosocial Impact of HIV/AIDS on the Development of Children
Author(s):
Mumah, Solomon J.; Muga, Richard O.; Ruhigisha, Joy P.; Munyana, Gertrude F. K.; Kigen, Edward M.
Author Details:
Solomon J. Mumah, Lecturer, Department of Psychology, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya, email: scjmumah@yahoo.ca; Richard O. Muga; Joy P. Ruhigisha; Gertrude F.K. Munyana; Edward M. Kigen
Abstract:
This paper discusses the psychosocial impact of HIV/AIDS following the revelation that 1.5 million people have died of HIV/AIDS in Kenya, while another 1.3 million children have been orphaned. With HIV prevalence rate of 6.7% and a mortality rate of 700 per day among adults of reproductive age, the importance of such an analysis cannot be overemphasized. The paper focuses particularly on the loss of caregiver support and the resultant stress on caregiving systems and on children's development and adjustment in Kenya. The expected effects on children in the domains of economic and food security, psychosocial care, education, health, family composition and stability of care are first generally reviewed. The close association between poverty and HIV/AIDS is discussed next with keen attention to the likely co-occurrence of HIV/AIDS, poverty, loss of caregivers and deprivation associated with deepening poverty particularly in resource-deficit neighbourhoods. In the final analysis, it is made clear that the impact on large numbers of children of the combined effects of poverty and HIV/AIDS (as seen in increased cases of school drop out, child labour abuses and the sexual exploitation and trafficking of children) are likely to cause significant social disruption.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Psychosocial Impact of HIV/AIDS on the Development of Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMumah, Solomon J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMuga, Richard O.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRuhigisha, Joy P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMunyana, Gertrude F. K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKigen, Edward M.en_US
dc.author.detailsSolomon J. Mumah, Lecturer, Department of Psychology, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya, email: scjmumah@yahoo.ca; Richard O. Muga; Joy P. Ruhigisha; Gertrude F.K. Munyana; Edward M. Kigenen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163997-
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses the psychosocial impact of HIV/AIDS following the revelation that 1.5 million people have died of HIV/AIDS in Kenya, while another 1.3 million children have been orphaned. With HIV prevalence rate of 6.7% and a mortality rate of 700 per day among adults of reproductive age, the importance of such an analysis cannot be overemphasized. The paper focuses particularly on the loss of caregiver support and the resultant stress on caregiving systems and on children's development and adjustment in Kenya. The expected effects on children in the domains of economic and food security, psychosocial care, education, health, family composition and stability of care are first generally reviewed. The close association between poverty and HIV/AIDS is discussed next with keen attention to the likely co-occurrence of HIV/AIDS, poverty, loss of caregivers and deprivation associated with deepening poverty particularly in resource-deficit neighbourhoods. In the final analysis, it is made clear that the impact on large numbers of children of the combined effects of poverty and HIV/AIDS (as seen in increased cases of school drop out, child labour abuses and the sexual exploitation and trafficking of children) are likely to cause significant social disruption.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:18Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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