Women and Health in Africa Within the Context of Oppression and Gender-Based Violence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163998
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women and Health in Africa Within the Context of Oppression and Gender-Based Violence
Author(s):
Naidoo, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Naidoo, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, Western Cape, South Africa, email: pnaidoo@uwc.ac.za
Abstract:
The definition given by Marks et al. (2000) for health reflects its complexities. They define health as: "a state of being with physical, cultural, psychosocial, economic and spiritual attributes, not simply the absence of illness" (p.4). While this definition of health is progressive, it is a stark reminder of the extent of the challenge that developing countries face to attain an ideal state of health for its citizens. In many countries of Africa and Asia, the majority of individuals are economically, socially and educationally disadvantaged. The fundamental nature of disempowerment in Africa may be understood within the context of colonization and its effects. One main effect is the lack of sustained economic growth. This has further impacted economic, social, and educational developments that build resources to help sustain a nation, promote health and enable citizens to enjoy a reasonable quality of life. Other factors that disempower individuals and hinder the development of healthy individuals are sociological and psychological. Marginalized groups are particularly affected. Women and children often suffer the consequences of repressive and oppressive sociological practices that render them psychologically disadvantaged, especially in societies where the patriarchal system is firmly entrenched. The consequence is that the mental and physical health of women in Africa is constantly under threat. Young women still undergo genital mutilation under the guise of cultural practice. South Africa is known to have the highest number of reported rape in the world. Domestic violence is commonplace and women are more likely to be killed by their male partners than any other category of persons. One of the most devastating effects of gender-based violence (including rape) is the high prevalence of HIV and AIDS among women. Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest prevalence of AIDS transmitted through heterosexual intercourse and just as many females are affected as males. Chin (1990) estimates that about 2.5 million women in sub-Saharan Africa had been infected with the HIV virus and about a quarter of a million had developed AIDS. Many with AIDS were at childbearing age. It is clear that Africa is challenged by the physical and mental health of women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen and Health in Africa Within the Context of Oppression and Gender-Based Violenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNaidoo, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Naidoo, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, Western Cape, South Africa, email: pnaidoo@uwc.ac.zaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163998-
dc.description.abstractThe definition given by Marks et al. (2000) for health reflects its complexities. They define health as: "a state of being with physical, cultural, psychosocial, economic and spiritual attributes, not simply the absence of illness" (p.4). While this definition of health is progressive, it is a stark reminder of the extent of the challenge that developing countries face to attain an ideal state of health for its citizens. In many countries of Africa and Asia, the majority of individuals are economically, socially and educationally disadvantaged. The fundamental nature of disempowerment in Africa may be understood within the context of colonization and its effects. One main effect is the lack of sustained economic growth. This has further impacted economic, social, and educational developments that build resources to help sustain a nation, promote health and enable citizens to enjoy a reasonable quality of life. Other factors that disempower individuals and hinder the development of healthy individuals are sociological and psychological. Marginalized groups are particularly affected. Women and children often suffer the consequences of repressive and oppressive sociological practices that render them psychologically disadvantaged, especially in societies where the patriarchal system is firmly entrenched. The consequence is that the mental and physical health of women in Africa is constantly under threat. Young women still undergo genital mutilation under the guise of cultural practice. South Africa is known to have the highest number of reported rape in the world. Domestic violence is commonplace and women are more likely to be killed by their male partners than any other category of persons. One of the most devastating effects of gender-based violence (including rape) is the high prevalence of HIV and AIDS among women. Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest prevalence of AIDS transmitted through heterosexual intercourse and just as many females are affected as males. Chin (1990) estimates that about 2.5 million women in sub-Saharan Africa had been infected with the HIV virus and about a quarter of a million had developed AIDS. Many with AIDS were at childbearing age. It is clear that Africa is challenged by the physical and mental health of women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:19Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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