An Investigation of the Coverage of Immunization of Children Under 1 in the Tribal Societies of Kohkiluye and Boyrahmad Provinces (1382)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163999
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Investigation of the Coverage of Immunization of Children Under 1 in the Tribal Societies of Kohkiluye and Boyrahmad Provinces (1382)
Author(s):
Naimi, Ebrahim; Chaman, R.; Afsoon, E.
Author Details:
Ebrahim Naimi, Lecturer of University, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Kohgiloyeh and Bovairahma, Iran, email: ebnaimi2002@yahoo.com; R. Chaman; E. Afsoon
Abstract:
Objective: To determine the extent to which children under the age of 1 are vaccinated in the tribal societies of Kohkiluyeh and Boyrahmad provinces. Background: The vaccination of children less than 1 year old is one of the most important programs in the country, at all levels of the health and treatment organization. Due to geographical dispersion and migration during different seasons of the year, tribal societies are the most vulnerable in the field of health services and vaccination. Design: This cross-sectional, descriptive study was performed on a sample of 69 children. A questionnaire was designed to collect data. Results: The total coverage of the B.C.G vaccine was 97.1% and for the oral polio vaccine, it was 98.4%, 98.2% and 97.7% for the first, second and third stages respectively. It appeared to be the same for the DPT vaccine. The coverage of Hepatitis for the first, second, and third stages was 98.6%, 95.2% and 95% respectively. The total coverage of the oral polio vaccine at zero stage (at birth) was 85.5%. All the vaccines were received with delays. The first stage of Hepatitis was delayed by 27.6 days and the second stage by 74.3 days. The first stage of measles was delayed by 295.4 days. The shortest delay had to do with the zero stage polio vaccine (10.9 days). The third stage Hepatitis was delayed by 272.4 days. The main reasons for delay were distance from vaccination stations (27.3%), unavailability of vaccine officers (26.2%) and the mother's lack of knowledge (14.2%). Conclusion: Revising monitoring techniques, supervising mobile vaccination teams and training and reinstructing personnel officers about the vaccination itself are required in order to improve the present status of vaccination in tribal societies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Investigation of the Coverage of Immunization of Children Under 1 in the Tribal Societies of Kohkiluye and Boyrahmad Provinces (1382)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorNaimi, Ebrahimen_US
dc.contributor.authorChaman, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAfsoon, E.en_US
dc.author.detailsEbrahim Naimi, Lecturer of University, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Kohgiloyeh and Bovairahma, Iran, email: ebnaimi2002@yahoo.com; R. Chaman; E. Afsoonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163999-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine the extent to which children under the age of 1 are vaccinated in the tribal societies of Kohkiluyeh and Boyrahmad provinces. Background: The vaccination of children less than 1 year old is one of the most important programs in the country, at all levels of the health and treatment organization. Due to geographical dispersion and migration during different seasons of the year, tribal societies are the most vulnerable in the field of health services and vaccination. Design: This cross-sectional, descriptive study was performed on a sample of 69 children. A questionnaire was designed to collect data. Results: The total coverage of the B.C.G vaccine was 97.1% and for the oral polio vaccine, it was 98.4%, 98.2% and 97.7% for the first, second and third stages respectively. It appeared to be the same for the DPT vaccine. The coverage of Hepatitis for the first, second, and third stages was 98.6%, 95.2% and 95% respectively. The total coverage of the oral polio vaccine at zero stage (at birth) was 85.5%. All the vaccines were received with delays. The first stage of Hepatitis was delayed by 27.6 days and the second stage by 74.3 days. The first stage of measles was delayed by 295.4 days. The shortest delay had to do with the zero stage polio vaccine (10.9 days). The third stage Hepatitis was delayed by 272.4 days. The main reasons for delay were distance from vaccination stations (27.3%), unavailability of vaccine officers (26.2%) and the mother's lack of knowledge (14.2%). Conclusion: Revising monitoring techniques, supervising mobile vaccination teams and training and reinstructing personnel officers about the vaccination itself are required in order to improve the present status of vaccination in tribal societies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:20Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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