2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164002
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Human Trafficking and Human Rights of Women and Children
Author(s):
Obokata, Tom
Author Details:
Tom Obokata, Lecturer in Law, University of Dundee, Dundee, Angus, Scotland, email: t.obokata@dundee.ac.uk
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to explore the victimization of women and children who have been caught up in the rapidly growing practice known as trafficking of human beings. It starts with an examination of the definition of trafficking. A particular reference will be made to the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, attached to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (2000), because it serves as guidance for states to implement national laws and policies. The key elements of the practice are identified in comparison with "smuggling of human beings" which is a separate act from trafficking itself. The paper then illustrates the process of trafficking in its entirety, including the causes and consequences. Issues particular to women and children, such as lack of education, discrimination, child labour (including child soldiers) and sexual slavery are examined in depth so as to promote better understanding of how women and children are victimized in the process. It proceeds with an analysis of how trafficking of women and children breaches the human rights standards established under international law. Such norms/principles as prohibition of torture and slavery, non-discrimination, rights to work and education are some of the pertinent examples. The paper ends with an articulation of key obligations which can be imposed upon states under international human rights law: obligations to 1) prohibit trafficking, 2) prosecute traffickers, and 3) protect victims (so-called 3P obligations). The main conclusion reached is that trafficking of women and children is clearly a human rights issue, and that states bear the primary responsibility to eradicate this evil of the contemporary world.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHuman Trafficking and Human Rights of Women and Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorObokata, Tomen_US
dc.author.detailsTom Obokata, Lecturer in Law, University of Dundee, Dundee, Angus, Scotland, email: t.obokata@dundee.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164002-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to explore the victimization of women and children who have been caught up in the rapidly growing practice known as trafficking of human beings. It starts with an examination of the definition of trafficking. A particular reference will be made to the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, attached to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (2000), because it serves as guidance for states to implement national laws and policies. The key elements of the practice are identified in comparison with "smuggling of human beings" which is a separate act from trafficking itself. The paper then illustrates the process of trafficking in its entirety, including the causes and consequences. Issues particular to women and children, such as lack of education, discrimination, child labour (including child soldiers) and sexual slavery are examined in depth so as to promote better understanding of how women and children are victimized in the process. It proceeds with an analysis of how trafficking of women and children breaches the human rights standards established under international law. Such norms/principles as prohibition of torture and slavery, non-discrimination, rights to work and education are some of the pertinent examples. The paper ends with an articulation of key obligations which can be imposed upon states under international human rights law: obligations to 1) prohibit trafficking, 2) prosecute traffickers, and 3) protect victims (so-called 3P obligations). The main conclusion reached is that trafficking of women and children is clearly a human rights issue, and that states bear the primary responsibility to eradicate this evil of the contemporary world.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:23Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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