2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164006
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Out of Africa: The Health Care Worker "Brain Drain"
Author(s):
Oluwole-Aina, Christine
Author Details:
Christine Oluwole-Aina, Student, Department of Anthropology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: oluwolco@mcmaster.ca
Abstract:
Introduction: We reside in a world wherein transnational flows of money, information and people spawn continuous debate about the effects of globalization on individual actors. One role of anthropologists studying globalization processes is to document and analyze the subtle and overt ways that they shape our 'everyday lives'. Globalization has enabled an increase in migration from the developing to developed world, and the ability to work abroad is often seen as a 'privilege'. The uprooting and disconnect of families and communities is not reflected in environments, which promote monetary gains as the key measure of success. Thereby, failing to understand the negative emotional and social consequences of migration. Purpose of the poster: The presentation will consist of a review of the literature, which focuses on the migration of health care professionals out of Africa and provides recommendations about the measures that need to be taken to address this issue. Literature Review: After reviewing the literature, it becomes evident that there is a continuous interplay between globalization and social, political and economical factors; limiting the success of health care systems in Africa to combat the HIV/AIDS crisis. Attempts are currently under way by governments and international organizations, to create and implement policy initiatives to mitigate the effects of the "brain drain". And while piles of paper work continue to constrain bureaucratic solutions, thousands of African health workers are taking matters in their own hands by securing their own personal futures. Conclusion: Examining the "brain drain" from an anthropological perspective allowed me to analyze the subtle and overt ways that globalization has facilitated an increase in migration from the developing to developed world. The empirical orientation of Anthropology allows us to bridge the abstract concepts of globalization studies and the lived experiences of people, in order to analyze how the stakes and interests vary according to the various actors and lastly the impact that "brain drain" has on combating the HIV/AIDS crisis in Africa.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOut of Africa: The Health Care Worker "Brain Drain"en_GB
dc.contributor.authorOluwole-Aina, Christineen_US
dc.author.detailsChristine Oluwole-Aina, Student, Department of Anthropology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: oluwolco@mcmaster.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164006-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: We reside in a world wherein transnational flows of money, information and people spawn continuous debate about the effects of globalization on individual actors. One role of anthropologists studying globalization processes is to document and analyze the subtle and overt ways that they shape our 'everyday lives'. Globalization has enabled an increase in migration from the developing to developed world, and the ability to work abroad is often seen as a 'privilege'. The uprooting and disconnect of families and communities is not reflected in environments, which promote monetary gains as the key measure of success. Thereby, failing to understand the negative emotional and social consequences of migration. Purpose of the poster: The presentation will consist of a review of the literature, which focuses on the migration of health care professionals out of Africa and provides recommendations about the measures that need to be taken to address this issue. Literature Review: After reviewing the literature, it becomes evident that there is a continuous interplay between globalization and social, political and economical factors; limiting the success of health care systems in Africa to combat the HIV/AIDS crisis. Attempts are currently under way by governments and international organizations, to create and implement policy initiatives to mitigate the effects of the "brain drain". And while piles of paper work continue to constrain bureaucratic solutions, thousands of African health workers are taking matters in their own hands by securing their own personal futures. Conclusion: Examining the "brain drain" from an anthropological perspective allowed me to analyze the subtle and overt ways that globalization has facilitated an increase in migration from the developing to developed world. The empirical orientation of Anthropology allows us to bridge the abstract concepts of globalization studies and the lived experiences of people, in order to analyze how the stakes and interests vary according to the various actors and lastly the impact that "brain drain" has on combating the HIV/AIDS crisis in Africa.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:27Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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