The Effects of a Proactive Competency-Based Program on at-risk Inncer City Children in Grades 1 to 5

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164007
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of a Proactive Competency-Based Program on at-risk Inncer City Children in Grades 1 to 5
Author(s):
O'Mara, Linda; Browne, Gina
Author Details:
Linda O'Mara, R.N., B.N., M.Sc., Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: omara@mcmaster.ca; Dr. Gina Browne
Abstract:
Introduction: Children living in high-risk environments may risk behaviour, social and academic problems. Evidence suggests that comprehensive programs are more beneficial than single issue programs. Purpose: To address whether competency based after-school program identified by teachers for at-risk children improve their behavioural, social and academic skills and reduce expenditures for their use in all other human services. Methods: A single-blind randomized control trial was completed with students from two inner city schools. Teachers identified at-risk children in grades 1 to 5, they were randomly assigned to an experimental, competency based program (Virtual Y), or usual care group. At baseline and at the end of the school year, behaviours were measured by the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBC); social skills by the M1 and M3, academic performance by the DRA and CAT3. Lastly, health and social services use was measured by the Health and Social Services Utilization Questionnaire (HSSU). Results: Eighty-five percent of participants completed the study (N = 109 children). Children in both study groups improved their CBC conduct disorder scores and social skills. The Experimental program compared to the usual care group had no significant differences on the CBC for behaviours. Socially, children in the Experimental program group coped better with aggression from others (M3 scale). Overall, children improved their academic functioning over the year (DRA, CAT3), although there were no group differences. Experimental program study children used more family physician services on the HSSU measure. Attendance at the Virtual Y program was less than expected. Conclusions: Social skills improved for children attending the competency-based program. Younger children academically improved more than older children. A larger sample size and higher program attendance are required to demonstrate statistical significance. More family involvement is encouraged. Investing in community-based programming for all children in high-risk environments would be beneficial.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of a Proactive Competency-Based Program on at-risk Inncer City Children in Grades 1 to 5en_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Mara, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Ginaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda O'Mara, R.N., B.N., M.Sc., Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: omara@mcmaster.ca; Dr. Gina Browneen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164007-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Children living in high-risk environments may risk behaviour, social and academic problems. Evidence suggests that comprehensive programs are more beneficial than single issue programs. Purpose: To address whether competency based after-school program identified by teachers for at-risk children improve their behavioural, social and academic skills and reduce expenditures for their use in all other human services. Methods: A single-blind randomized control trial was completed with students from two inner city schools. Teachers identified at-risk children in grades 1 to 5, they were randomly assigned to an experimental, competency based program (Virtual Y), or usual care group. At baseline and at the end of the school year, behaviours were measured by the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBC); social skills by the M1 and M3, academic performance by the DRA and CAT3. Lastly, health and social services use was measured by the Health and Social Services Utilization Questionnaire (HSSU). Results: Eighty-five percent of participants completed the study (N = 109 children). Children in both study groups improved their CBC conduct disorder scores and social skills. The Experimental program compared to the usual care group had no significant differences on the CBC for behaviours. Socially, children in the Experimental program group coped better with aggression from others (M3 scale). Overall, children improved their academic functioning over the year (DRA, CAT3), although there were no group differences. Experimental program study children used more family physician services on the HSSU measure. Attendance at the Virtual Y program was less than expected. Conclusions: Social skills improved for children attending the competency-based program. Younger children academically improved more than older children. A larger sample size and higher program attendance are required to demonstrate statistical significance. More family involvement is encouraged. Investing in community-based programming for all children in high-risk environments would be beneficial.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:28Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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