The Impact of Water Borne Diseases on Women and Children and the Importance of their Contribution to Enhance the Use of Safe Water

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164014
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Water Borne Diseases on Women and Children and the Importance of their Contribution to Enhance the Use of Safe Water
Author(s):
Pramanik, Azahar Ali; Martin, Maria
Author Details:
Azahar Ali Pramanik, Executive Director, Society for People's Actions in Change and Equity (SPACE), Baitul Aman Housing Society, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: space@btsnet.net; Maria Martin
Abstract:
Background: The crisis for safe water supply in Bangladesh due to the contamination of ground water by arsenic, and the scarce access to alternative ways for safe water supply is well known. After years of field work in close contact with the most distressed people, SPACE realized how, in this scenario, women and children are the most vulnerable subjects. Women's traditional lower mobility can enhance the manifestation of arsenicosis by drinking water from the same polluted sources for years. The lower social consideration that they often receive makes it difficult for them to have proper medical treatments and contributes to hide the real entity of this disease. The poor quality of the surface water makes the access to any alternative water source extremely difficult and women are forced to walk daily for long distances, carrying one or more jars, with serious implications for their health. Moreover, the awareness about the dangers due to the use of unsafe water is often quite low and children are particularly affected. The scarce awareness about the risks of contaminated water and poor sanitation can be more easily overcome when the motivational message is addressed to women and children. In fact women are traditionally most involved in the supply and use of water for cooking and drinking and in the hygienic care of the household. When properly trained, they demonstrated to be able to manage the facilities for safe water supply, while children are proved to be active vehicles of new ideas and behaviours to families. Significance: Referring to the field experience, SPACE realized that the interventions, to be effective, should follow demand from people, stimulated by motivational work, focusing on their self-reliance, and avoiding impositions by outsider donors. Then, the most technically and socially effective solutions must be identified and proposed. After analyzing and comparing the results of the solutions for water supply now available in Bangladesh SPACE concluded that, whenever possible, the use of rainwater harvesting family-based units, could give the best results. Women and children are seen as the main beneficiary of this approach.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Water Borne Diseases on Women and Children and the Importance of their Contribution to Enhance the Use of Safe Wateren_GB
dc.contributor.authorPramanik, Azahar Alien_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Mariaen_US
dc.author.detailsAzahar Ali Pramanik, Executive Director, Society for People's Actions in Change and Equity (SPACE), Baitul Aman Housing Society, Dhaka, Bangladesh, email: space@btsnet.net; Maria Martinen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164014-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The crisis for safe water supply in Bangladesh due to the contamination of ground water by arsenic, and the scarce access to alternative ways for safe water supply is well known. After years of field work in close contact with the most distressed people, SPACE realized how, in this scenario, women and children are the most vulnerable subjects. Women's traditional lower mobility can enhance the manifestation of arsenicosis by drinking water from the same polluted sources for years. The lower social consideration that they often receive makes it difficult for them to have proper medical treatments and contributes to hide the real entity of this disease. The poor quality of the surface water makes the access to any alternative water source extremely difficult and women are forced to walk daily for long distances, carrying one or more jars, with serious implications for their health. Moreover, the awareness about the dangers due to the use of unsafe water is often quite low and children are particularly affected. The scarce awareness about the risks of contaminated water and poor sanitation can be more easily overcome when the motivational message is addressed to women and children. In fact women are traditionally most involved in the supply and use of water for cooking and drinking and in the hygienic care of the household. When properly trained, they demonstrated to be able to manage the facilities for safe water supply, while children are proved to be active vehicles of new ideas and behaviours to families. Significance: Referring to the field experience, SPACE realized that the interventions, to be effective, should follow demand from people, stimulated by motivational work, focusing on their self-reliance, and avoiding impositions by outsider donors. Then, the most technically and socially effective solutions must be identified and proposed. After analyzing and comparing the results of the solutions for water supply now available in Bangladesh SPACE concluded that, whenever possible, the use of rainwater harvesting family-based units, could give the best results. Women and children are seen as the main beneficiary of this approach.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:36Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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