Concurrent Prevalence of Underweight and Overweight among Reproductive Age Women in South India: An Analysis of Trends and Determinants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164020
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Concurrent Prevalence of Underweight and Overweight among Reproductive Age Women in South India: An Analysis of Trends and Determinants
Author(s):
Ramesh, Poluru
Author Details:
Poluru Ramesh, PhD, Research Fellow, Population Research Centre, Gokhale Institute of Politics & Economics, Deccan Ghymkhana, Pune, Maharashtra, India, email: avkavya@gmail.com
Abstract:
Introduction: The world's health is undergoing an unprecedented transition in terms of epidemiology, nutrition and demographics. In resource-poor settings, rising urbanization and improvements in economic development lead to concurrent under-and-over nutrition in the population of developing countries. Although under-nutrition (underweight and stunting) remains prevalent, rates of overweight/obesity are steadily increasing, especially among adults. Hence, there are new public health problems, in addition to nutritional deficiencies. In India, there is evidence of an emerging nutrition transition a significant proportion of overweight women coexisting with high rates of under nutrition. Purpose: To explore trends in the shift from underweight to overweight and to investigate the coexistence of "double burden" of underweight and overweight/obese malnutrition and related factors among ever-married women aged 15 to 49 in the four South Indian states. Methods: Data from the Indian National Nutrition Monitoring Beauru Surveys and Second Indian National Family Health Survey with a sample of 14435 non-pregnant women aged 15-49 years. Multivariate logistic regression models identify and compare factors associated with underweight women (BMI <18.50 kg/m2) versus normal weight (BMI 18.5?24.9 kg/m2) and overweight or obese (BMI ¦25.00 kg/m2). Results: In South Indian, there are decreasing trends in chronic energy deficiency/underweight and increasing trends in the proportions of overweight/obesity among rural women during the periods 1975-1979 to 2000-2001. In Kerala, overweight/obese exceeded underweight. The findings from the multivariate analysis carried out separately for each south Indian state suggest that, similar factors are relevant to both under-and-overweight, and women from lower socio-economic groups are significantly more likely to have a low BMI (Underweight) and higher BMI (Overweight/obesity). Conclusion: Both chronic energy deficiency and overweight/obesity widespread in south Indian states and the prevalence varied significantly by subgroup. These findings illustrate the need for public health programs to address underweight and overweight simultaneously.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Host:
McMaster University
Conference Location:
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Description:
2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConcurrent Prevalence of Underweight and Overweight among Reproductive Age Women in South India: An Analysis of Trends and Determinantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRamesh, Poluruen_US
dc.author.detailsPoluru Ramesh, PhD, Research Fellow, Population Research Centre, Gokhale Institute of Politics & Economics, Deccan Ghymkhana, Pune, Maharashtra, India, email: avkavya@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164020-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The world's health is undergoing an unprecedented transition in terms of epidemiology, nutrition and demographics. In resource-poor settings, rising urbanization and improvements in economic development lead to concurrent under-and-over nutrition in the population of developing countries. Although under-nutrition (underweight and stunting) remains prevalent, rates of overweight/obesity are steadily increasing, especially among adults. Hence, there are new public health problems, in addition to nutritional deficiencies. In India, there is evidence of an emerging nutrition transition a significant proportion of overweight women coexisting with high rates of under nutrition. Purpose: To explore trends in the shift from underweight to overweight and to investigate the coexistence of "double burden" of underweight and overweight/obese malnutrition and related factors among ever-married women aged 15 to 49 in the four South Indian states. Methods: Data from the Indian National Nutrition Monitoring Beauru Surveys and Second Indian National Family Health Survey with a sample of 14435 non-pregnant women aged 15-49 years. Multivariate logistic regression models identify and compare factors associated with underweight women (BMI <18.50 kg/m2) versus normal weight (BMI 18.5?24.9 kg/m2) and overweight or obese (BMI &brvbar;25.00 kg/m2). Results: In South Indian, there are decreasing trends in chronic energy deficiency/underweight and increasing trends in the proportions of overweight/obesity among rural women during the periods 1975-1979 to 2000-2001. In Kerala, overweight/obese exceeded underweight. The findings from the multivariate analysis carried out separately for each south Indian state suggest that, similar factors are relevant to both under-and-overweight, and women from lower socio-economic groups are significantly more likely to have a low BMI (Underweight) and higher BMI (Overweight/obesity). Conclusion: Both chronic energy deficiency and overweight/obesity widespread in south Indian states and the prevalence varied significantly by subgroup. These findings illustrate the need for public health programs to address underweight and overweight simultaneously.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:36:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:36:43Z-
dc.conference.date2006-
dc.conference.hostMcMaster Universityen_US
dc.conference.locationDhaka, Bangladeshen_US
dc.description2006 International Conference: Dhaka, Bangladesh. The International Conference on the Impact of Global Issues on Women and Children, co-organized by McMaster University and the State University of Bangladesh, is an opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of development expertise and will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 12-16, 2006.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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