Prevalent symptoms in sleep-disturbed versus non sleep-disturbed breast cancer patients during and 4 to 6 months after cancer treatments

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164026
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalent symptoms in sleep-disturbed versus non sleep-disturbed breast cancer patients during and 4 to 6 months after cancer treatments
Author(s):
Cho, Maria; Dodd, Marylin
Author Details:
Maria Cho, RN, PhD, Assistant Adjunct Professor, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA, email: joshlizmykids@yahoo.com; Marylin Dodd, PhD, UCSF
Abstract:
Research Study: Sleep disturbance has been a symptom of high prevalence in breast cancer patients which, when left untreated, has negative consequences. However, few studies have reported on the prevalence of symptoms in breast cancer patients based on sleep disturbance at the beginning of chemotherapy, through to 4-6 months after cancer treatment. The study sought to evaluate prevalent symptoms in sleepdisturbed patients and non sleep-disturbed patients at the beginning of chemotherapy (T1), at the end of cancer treatments (T2), and 4-6 months after cancer treatments (T3). The present study is a secondary analysis of data collected as part of a longitudinal, randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of a systematic exercise intervention for cancer treatment-related fatigue and associated symptoms. Using intent to-treat analysis, the trial failed to show a significant effect. The General Sleep Disturbances Scale (GSDS) and Symptom Checklist (0-10 numeric scale) were used. A cutoff score of GSDS is 45 (0-147); GSDS > 45 indicates sleep disturbance. Both scales have been used in cancer patients. Descriptive statistics were used. A total of 112 breast cancer patients is divided by their general sleep disturbance scores (greater than 45=sleep disturbances). Fifty-three women (48.6%) were assigned to the Sleep-Disturbed Group. More than half of the Sleep-disturbed Group experienced 10 symptoms at T1, 7 symptoms at T2, and 5 symptoms at T3, compared to the NonSleep-disturbed Group (4 symptoms, 3 symptoms, and 0 symptoms at T1, T2, and T3). Four symptoms (thirst, difficulty concentrating, memory problems, and mood changes) were more than 50% present at all three points in the Sleep-disturbed Group. The Sleep-disturbed Group consistently experienced a higher prevalence rate and more symptoms than the Non Sleep-disturbed Group. Assessing baseline level of sleep disturbance is a tool for nurses to provide supportive care for sleep-disturbed patients who experience more symptoms in order to help them improve their quality of life and functional status.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalent symptoms in sleep-disturbed versus non sleep-disturbed breast cancer patients during and 4 to 6 months after cancer treatmentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCho, Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Marylinen_US
dc.author.detailsMaria Cho, RN, PhD, Assistant Adjunct Professor, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA, email: joshlizmykids@yahoo.com; Marylin Dodd, PhD, UCSFen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164026-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Sleep disturbance has been a symptom of high prevalence in breast cancer patients which, when left untreated, has negative consequences. However, few studies have reported on the prevalence of symptoms in breast cancer patients based on sleep disturbance at the beginning of chemotherapy, through to 4-6 months after cancer treatment. The study sought to evaluate prevalent symptoms in sleepdisturbed patients and non sleep-disturbed patients at the beginning of chemotherapy (T1), at the end of cancer treatments (T2), and 4-6 months after cancer treatments (T3). The present study is a secondary analysis of data collected as part of a longitudinal, randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of a systematic exercise intervention for cancer treatment-related fatigue and associated symptoms. Using intent to-treat analysis, the trial failed to show a significant effect. The General Sleep Disturbances Scale (GSDS) and Symptom Checklist (0-10 numeric scale) were used. A cutoff score of GSDS is 45 (0-147); GSDS > 45 indicates sleep disturbance. Both scales have been used in cancer patients. Descriptive statistics were used. A total of 112 breast cancer patients is divided by their general sleep disturbance scores (greater than 45=sleep disturbances). Fifty-three women (48.6%) were assigned to the Sleep-Disturbed Group. More than half of the Sleep-disturbed Group experienced 10 symptoms at T1, 7 symptoms at T2, and 5 symptoms at T3, compared to the NonSleep-disturbed Group (4 symptoms, 3 symptoms, and 0 symptoms at T1, T2, and T3). Four symptoms (thirst, difficulty concentrating, memory problems, and mood changes) were more than 50% present at all three points in the Sleep-disturbed Group. The Sleep-disturbed Group consistently experienced a higher prevalence rate and more symptoms than the Non Sleep-disturbed Group. Assessing baseline level of sleep disturbance is a tool for nurses to provide supportive care for sleep-disturbed patients who experience more symptoms in order to help them improve their quality of life and functional status.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:20Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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