Developing Education to Examine Best Practice and Identify Potential Practice Drift Related to Patient Identification

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164028
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing Education to Examine Best Practice and Identify Potential Practice Drift Related to Patient Identification
Author(s):
Conyers, Allison; Watson, Pamela; Hillson, John; Williams, Catherine; Allen, Deborah H.; Green, Katrina
Author Details:
Allison Conyers, RN, BSN, OCN, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: alliess20@hotmail.com; Pamela Watson, RN, BSN, BS; John Hillson, RN, OCN; Catherine Williams, RN, MSN, FNP-C; Deborah H. Allen, MSN, RN, CNS, FNP-BC, AOCNP; Katrina Green, RN, BSN, OCN
Abstract:
Education: In oncology, we strive for safe and best practice yet risk for human error is unavoidable in a fast-paced high acuity setting. It is essential to be aware of these risks and ensure that process standards are clearly understood. Performance Improvement provided evidence that incidence of errors was increasing over time for two inpatient units. Therefore, a task-force was created to reinforce best practices to decrease risk for errors and increase patient safety, thus improving patient outcomes. The task-force was charged with identifying areas for error through use of policy and standards to address practice drift. The primary drift involved procedures requiring two nurses in the identification/verification process. It was necessary to develop an educational program for those directly involved in patient care to raise awareness of drift and risk for error in a less threatening and more meaningful format in which to encourage best practice. A number of areas were identified for potential drift of best practice which directly increase risk for the patient. It was determined that a case study presentation could best address the practice drift with policy and standards reviewed. It was decided that nursing staff from these units are better suited to present the educational format. Surveys prior to the presentation focusing on current practice to highlight drift are included with evaluation ongoing. Data analysis will be completed in three months. It is anticipated staff will report satisfaction with case study presentation and identify their need to improve practice. Incidence of errors related to patient identification processes will be monitored for actual change in practice. The goal is that process standards will be followed and error decreased. Increased attentiveness of daily operations and the effect of choices on patient safety are essential for performance improvement. Reviewing policies and standards and incorporating them into the culture of the unit will increase awareness of the importance of patient identification resulting in less errors and improved patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping Education to Examine Best Practice and Identify Potential Practice Drift Related to Patient Identificationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConyers, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHillson, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Deborah H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Katrinaen_US
dc.author.detailsAllison Conyers, RN, BSN, OCN, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: alliess20@hotmail.com; Pamela Watson, RN, BSN, BS; John Hillson, RN, OCN; Catherine Williams, RN, MSN, FNP-C; Deborah H. Allen, MSN, RN, CNS, FNP-BC, AOCNP; Katrina Green, RN, BSN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164028-
dc.description.abstractEducation: In oncology, we strive for safe and best practice yet risk for human error is unavoidable in a fast-paced high acuity setting. It is essential to be aware of these risks and ensure that process standards are clearly understood. Performance Improvement provided evidence that incidence of errors was increasing over time for two inpatient units. Therefore, a task-force was created to reinforce best practices to decrease risk for errors and increase patient safety, thus improving patient outcomes. The task-force was charged with identifying areas for error through use of policy and standards to address practice drift. The primary drift involved procedures requiring two nurses in the identification/verification process. It was necessary to develop an educational program for those directly involved in patient care to raise awareness of drift and risk for error in a less threatening and more meaningful format in which to encourage best practice. A number of areas were identified for potential drift of best practice which directly increase risk for the patient. It was determined that a case study presentation could best address the practice drift with policy and standards reviewed. It was decided that nursing staff from these units are better suited to present the educational format. Surveys prior to the presentation focusing on current practice to highlight drift are included with evaluation ongoing. Data analysis will be completed in three months. It is anticipated staff will report satisfaction with case study presentation and identify their need to improve practice. Incidence of errors related to patient identification processes will be monitored for actual change in practice. The goal is that process standards will be followed and error decreased. Increased attentiveness of daily operations and the effect of choices on patient safety are essential for performance improvement. Reviewing policies and standards and incorporating them into the culture of the unit will increase awareness of the importance of patient identification resulting in less errors and improved patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:23Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.