2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164032
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CNS Analysis Of The Volume Of Tracheostomy Patients In A Large Metropolitian Hospital
Author(s):
Jeffries, Marian
Author Details:
Marian Jeffries, MSN, RN, FNP-C, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Problem and Significance: The volume of patients with tracheostomies being cared for outside of an ICU is growing. Many of these patients are discharged and need instruction on airway management to go home. The CNS is in a pivotal position to influence this issue and enhance care for all patients. Tracheostomy care on the general care units varies with staff, skill, experience, and resources available. Since patient discharge occurs from the general care unit, teaching of the patient and family is more likely to happen in this arena. Purpose: The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a.) To identify the volume of tracheostomy patients cared for over one year in a large New England metropolitan Hospital (b.) To evaluate nursing skills related to tracheostomy care and education for patients across the institution. Method: Retrospective review of billing data for respiratory equipment, specific to each patient with a tracheostomy was completed, including patient location and number of days with a tracheostomy for each patient unit. Results: Patient locations were spread across forty units within the institution. In 2002, there were more 485 patients in adult general care units with more than 6500 "trach days". Data from 2003 are similar with 687 patients with over 6200 trach days. Resources available/utilized for the RN to educate these patients/family were inconsistent. No explicit Standard for patient education regarding the care and management of one's tracheostomy was used across the institution. Interpretation/Conclusions: The clinical indications and patient acuity, as well as age and stage of the patient at the time of the tracheostomy, varies. The critical elements necessary for the management of the airway, and equipment does not vary. Implications for Nursing Practice: The CNS analysis of these findings demonstrated the need for development of a single Standard for patient/family education and to assist staff to utilize this Standard in clinical practice. The strategies used have been multifaceted. These included informal classes, on-line education via hospital intranet, CNS consultation and a sufficient number of tracheal teaching models for hands-on practice. The effectiveness of these CNS interventions will be monitored through an existing annual survey, which includes common patient problems.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCNS Analysis Of The Volume Of Tracheostomy Patients In A Large Metropolitian Hospitalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJeffries, Marianen_US
dc.author.detailsMarian Jeffries, MSN, RN, FNP-C, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164032-
dc.description.abstractProblem and Significance: The volume of patients with tracheostomies being cared for outside of an ICU is growing. Many of these patients are discharged and need instruction on airway management to go home. The CNS is in a pivotal position to influence this issue and enhance care for all patients. Tracheostomy care on the general care units varies with staff, skill, experience, and resources available. Since patient discharge occurs from the general care unit, teaching of the patient and family is more likely to happen in this arena. Purpose: The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a.) To identify the volume of tracheostomy patients cared for over one year in a large New England metropolitan Hospital (b.) To evaluate nursing skills related to tracheostomy care and education for patients across the institution. Method: Retrospective review of billing data for respiratory equipment, specific to each patient with a tracheostomy was completed, including patient location and number of days with a tracheostomy for each patient unit. Results: Patient locations were spread across forty units within the institution. In 2002, there were more 485 patients in adult general care units with more than 6500 "trach days". Data from 2003 are similar with 687 patients with over 6200 trach days. Resources available/utilized for the RN to educate these patients/family were inconsistent. No explicit Standard for patient education regarding the care and management of one's tracheostomy was used across the institution. Interpretation/Conclusions: The clinical indications and patient acuity, as well as age and stage of the patient at the time of the tracheostomy, varies. The critical elements necessary for the management of the airway, and equipment does not vary. Implications for Nursing Practice: The CNS analysis of these findings demonstrated the need for development of a single Standard for patient/family education and to assist staff to utilize this Standard in clinical practice. The strategies used have been multifaceted. These included informal classes, on-line education via hospital intranet, CNS consultation and a sufficient number of tracheal teaching models for hands-on practice. The effectiveness of these CNS interventions will be monitored through an existing annual survey, which includes common patient problems.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:42Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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