2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164033
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End-of Life Care: The Role of the CNS in a Palliative Care Program
Author(s):
Jones, Kristy
Author Details:
Kristy Jones, MS, RN, CS, St. John's Regional Medical Center, Joplin, Missouri, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: To improve quality at end-of-life to patients and families through relief of suffering, symptom control, and psychological and spiritual support, in a manner that further supports the mission and ministry of the organization. Background: When the decision is made to shift from life-prolonging, curative treatment to supportive care, gaps can occur in knowledge and skill to address the unique and complex situations that arise when caring for the dying. For more than a decade, the World Health Organization (WHO) has provided objectives to guide practitioners in the provision of palliative care. These objectives include affirmation that dying is a normal process, provision of pain/symptom relief, integration of psychological and spiritual aspects of care, and support systems for patients and their families. Description of the Program: The organization participated in a focus group research project for care of the dying in 1996. From that experience grew an inpatient palliative care team and development of an interdisciplinary, holistic model of care focusing on the final days of life. The team developed a collaborative care pathway, standing physician orders, operational policies and protocols for admission criteria, pain management, and symptom control, submitted applications and received grant monies, hired a coordinator, designed an inpatient unit, developed patient/family educational materials, provided staff and physician education, integrated complementary therapies, and promoted the program throughout the organization, the community, the corporate system, and the nation. The CNS was an integral part of the entire process, particularly lending expertise in pain/symptom control, pathway/policy development, identification of appropriate patients for service, and selection and implementation of complementary therapies. Outcomes: Affirmation and sustainability of the program is seen in a demonstration of cost savings, number served, use of standing orders by medical staff, and family overall satisfaction. Conclusion: This model is easily replicated and can reap vast rewards for the patients, their families, staff and organization. Implication for Practice: NACNS is committed to support development of knowledge and expertise in palliative and end-of-life care. Recognizing the unique and comprehensive influence of the CNS will improve quality within and across the health care system.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd-of Life Care: The Role of the CNS in a Palliative Care Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Kristyen_US
dc.author.detailsKristy Jones, MS, RN, CS, St. John's Regional Medical Center, Joplin, Missouri, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164033-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To improve quality at end-of-life to patients and families through relief of suffering, symptom control, and psychological and spiritual support, in a manner that further supports the mission and ministry of the organization. Background: When the decision is made to shift from life-prolonging, curative treatment to supportive care, gaps can occur in knowledge and skill to address the unique and complex situations that arise when caring for the dying. For more than a decade, the World Health Organization (WHO) has provided objectives to guide practitioners in the provision of palliative care. These objectives include affirmation that dying is a normal process, provision of pain/symptom relief, integration of psychological and spiritual aspects of care, and support systems for patients and their families. Description of the Program: The organization participated in a focus group research project for care of the dying in 1996. From that experience grew an inpatient palliative care team and development of an interdisciplinary, holistic model of care focusing on the final days of life. The team developed a collaborative care pathway, standing physician orders, operational policies and protocols for admission criteria, pain management, and symptom control, submitted applications and received grant monies, hired a coordinator, designed an inpatient unit, developed patient/family educational materials, provided staff and physician education, integrated complementary therapies, and promoted the program throughout the organization, the community, the corporate system, and the nation. The CNS was an integral part of the entire process, particularly lending expertise in pain/symptom control, pathway/policy development, identification of appropriate patients for service, and selection and implementation of complementary therapies. Outcomes: Affirmation and sustainability of the program is seen in a demonstration of cost savings, number served, use of standing orders by medical staff, and family overall satisfaction. Conclusion: This model is easily replicated and can reap vast rewards for the patients, their families, staff and organization. Implication for Practice: NACNS is committed to support development of knowledge and expertise in palliative and end-of-life care. Recognizing the unique and comprehensive influence of the CNS will improve quality within and across the health care system.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:44Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.