2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164034
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Supervisors, Managers and Providers about the CNS Role
Author(s):
LaCoste, Janice; Brown, Irene; Kastner, Mary
Author Details:
Janice LaCoste, RN, BSN, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Irene Brown, RN, CNS, MS; Mary Kastner, RN, CNS, MS
Abstract:
Problem/Significance: Despite a clear Board of Registered Nursing defined CNS role, confusion and ambiguity are common themes in CNS literature. Little research is done on the perceptions of managers, supervisors, and providers about the CNS role, however the perceptions of managers, supervisors, and providers effect how the CNS actualizes their role. Understanding their perceptions may clarify the gap between the ideal and the actual role that has been identified in the literature. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify perceptions of the managers (CM) who consult with a CNS, supervisors (SM) who manage a CNS and providers (P) who work with a CNS to gain a better understanding of the CNS role. The specific aim is to determine if any variations exist among the groups. Design/Methods: A 25-item descriptive survey, developed by a CNS focus group, sought information about current CNS activities and perceptions about the BRN defined role of the CNS from their direct report supervisors, nurse managers, and providers who request services from them in a large HMO setting. A separate 7-question descriptive survey sought information from the CNSs about their current activities and time on the unit. All certified CNSs were invited to distribute the surveys to persons meeting the inclusion criteria and to complete a separate 7-question descriptive survey about their activities and time on the unit. Surveys were returned in sealed envelopes to maintain confidentiality. Findings: Respondents consisted of 12% (13) SM, 31% (34) CM, and 58% (64) P with 52% (58) from in-patient setting, 37% (41) outpatient setting, and 11% (12) both settings. Consulting (88%) & supervising (77%) managers were more likely than providers (36%) to request CNSs to develop educational programs (p=0.0). Consulting (85%) & supervising (92%) managers were more likely than providers (47%) to request CNSs to work with staff to improve practice. Consulting (76%) & supervising (77%) managers were more likely than providers (30%) to request CNSs to assist and promote staff development (p=0.0). SM (85%) were more likely than CM (62%), and P (47%) to request CNSs to mentor nursing staff (p=0.0). Providers (70%) were more likely than CM (41%) and SM (46%) to request CNSs to educate and make recommendations to patients (p=0.016). Conclusions: The perspective of the supervising managers about their need for CNS services focuses on direct care staff to improve practice, mentor staff, develop educational programs, provide clinical expertise and consult on complex patients. The perspective of the consulting managers' focus is consistent with the need to support staff by improving practice through education, mentoring and clinical expertise; but they also see a need for research and patient education. Finally, the perspective of the provider is more patient-focused as seen by their emphasis on patient education, consulting on complex patients, and providing clinical expertise. The CNS must balance responsibilities related to organizational needs with the needs of these 3 diverse groups, and their personal need to fulfill all 5 expert roles. Implication for practice: Understanding the variation in perceptions and needs can assist the CNS in shaping and actualizing their role. Integrating the organizational goals into their practice may provide further guidance for their role development.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Supervisors, Managers and Providers about the CNS Roleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaCoste, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Ireneen_US
dc.contributor.authorKastner, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsJanice LaCoste, RN, BSN, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Irene Brown, RN, CNS, MS; Mary Kastner, RN, CNS, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164034-
dc.description.abstractProblem/Significance: Despite a clear Board of Registered Nursing defined CNS role, confusion and ambiguity are common themes in CNS literature. Little research is done on the perceptions of managers, supervisors, and providers about the CNS role, however the perceptions of managers, supervisors, and providers effect how the CNS actualizes their role. Understanding their perceptions may clarify the gap between the ideal and the actual role that has been identified in the literature. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify perceptions of the managers (CM) who consult with a CNS, supervisors (SM) who manage a CNS and providers (P) who work with a CNS to gain a better understanding of the CNS role. The specific aim is to determine if any variations exist among the groups. Design/Methods: A 25-item descriptive survey, developed by a CNS focus group, sought information about current CNS activities and perceptions about the BRN defined role of the CNS from their direct report supervisors, nurse managers, and providers who request services from them in a large HMO setting. A separate 7-question descriptive survey sought information from the CNSs about their current activities and time on the unit. All certified CNSs were invited to distribute the surveys to persons meeting the inclusion criteria and to complete a separate 7-question descriptive survey about their activities and time on the unit. Surveys were returned in sealed envelopes to maintain confidentiality. Findings: Respondents consisted of 12% (13) SM, 31% (34) CM, and 58% (64) P with 52% (58) from in-patient setting, 37% (41) outpatient setting, and 11% (12) both settings. Consulting (88%) & supervising (77%) managers were more likely than providers (36%) to request CNSs to develop educational programs (p=0.0). Consulting (85%) & supervising (92%) managers were more likely than providers (47%) to request CNSs to work with staff to improve practice. Consulting (76%) & supervising (77%) managers were more likely than providers (30%) to request CNSs to assist and promote staff development (p=0.0). SM (85%) were more likely than CM (62%), and P (47%) to request CNSs to mentor nursing staff (p=0.0). Providers (70%) were more likely than CM (41%) and SM (46%) to request CNSs to educate and make recommendations to patients (p=0.016). Conclusions: The perspective of the supervising managers about their need for CNS services focuses on direct care staff to improve practice, mentor staff, develop educational programs, provide clinical expertise and consult on complex patients. The perspective of the consulting managers' focus is consistent with the need to support staff by improving practice through education, mentoring and clinical expertise; but they also see a need for research and patient education. Finally, the perspective of the provider is more patient-focused as seen by their emphasis on patient education, consulting on complex patients, and providing clinical expertise. The CNS must balance responsibilities related to organizational needs with the needs of these 3 diverse groups, and their personal need to fulfill all 5 expert roles. Implication for practice: Understanding the variation in perceptions and needs can assist the CNS in shaping and actualizing their role. Integrating the organizational goals into their practice may provide further guidance for their role development.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:45Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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