2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164037
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Management of Alcohol Withdrawal in the Acute Care Setting
Author(s):
Lipkis-Orlando, Robin; Guire, Barbara; Lussier-Cushing, Mary; Mitchell, Monique; Repper-DeLisi, Jennifer
Author Details:
Robin Lipkis-Orlando, RN, CS, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Barbara Guire, RN, CS; Mary Lussier-Cushing, RN, CS; Monique Mitchell, RN, CS; Jennifer Repper-DeLisi, RN, CS
Abstract:
Purpose: To provide clinicians with skills to assess all patients for risk of alcohol withdrawal and facilitate prophylaxis treatment for patients presenting with alcohol dependence. Background: Alcohol is the most abused drug affecting 15-20 million Americans. As Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialists in a large acute care medical center we encountered a concerning number of patients presenting in various stages of withdrawal. Nursing and medical staff identified these patients as non-compliant, angry, agitated and combative rather than suffering from alcohol withdrawal. It became clear from our assessments that alcohol withdrawal was under-recognized, not considered in the differential or under-treated. Description of the Project: A collaborative group of clinical experts including psychiatric CNS', medicine, psychiatry, emergency medicine, addictions and pharmacy convened to examine current practice and factors contributing to medical complications. The result of this work is a new alcohol withdrawal pathway to guide clinicians in assessment and treatment of patients utilizing standing orders instead of the symptom-triggered pathway that was in use. The organization wide educational program included unit based in-services, grand rounds, bedside support and, plans for on line education. Outcomes: Initiation of the new pathway is in process. The expected outcomes are to improve clinical assessment and efficacy of treatment, increase clinician comfort level, increase safety, reduce medical complications and decrease length of stay. Interpretation: Data collection is ongoing and includes dimensions of quality of care and staff competence. Implications for Nursing Practice: Increasing staff competence, comfort, safety and quality of life on inpatient units may increase job satisfaction and retention and decrease anxiety in treating these complicated patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManagement of Alcohol Withdrawal in the Acute Care Settingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLipkis-Orlando, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuire, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorLussier-Cushing, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Moniqueen_US
dc.contributor.authorRepper-DeLisi, Jenniferen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Lipkis-Orlando, RN, CS, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Barbara Guire, RN, CS; Mary Lussier-Cushing, RN, CS; Monique Mitchell, RN, CS; Jennifer Repper-DeLisi, RN, CSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164037-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To provide clinicians with skills to assess all patients for risk of alcohol withdrawal and facilitate prophylaxis treatment for patients presenting with alcohol dependence. Background: Alcohol is the most abused drug affecting 15-20 million Americans. As Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialists in a large acute care medical center we encountered a concerning number of patients presenting in various stages of withdrawal. Nursing and medical staff identified these patients as non-compliant, angry, agitated and combative rather than suffering from alcohol withdrawal. It became clear from our assessments that alcohol withdrawal was under-recognized, not considered in the differential or under-treated. Description of the Project: A collaborative group of clinical experts including psychiatric CNS', medicine, psychiatry, emergency medicine, addictions and pharmacy convened to examine current practice and factors contributing to medical complications. The result of this work is a new alcohol withdrawal pathway to guide clinicians in assessment and treatment of patients utilizing standing orders instead of the symptom-triggered pathway that was in use. The organization wide educational program included unit based in-services, grand rounds, bedside support and, plans for on line education. Outcomes: Initiation of the new pathway is in process. The expected outcomes are to improve clinical assessment and efficacy of treatment, increase clinician comfort level, increase safety, reduce medical complications and decrease length of stay. Interpretation: Data collection is ongoing and includes dimensions of quality of care and staff competence. Implications for Nursing Practice: Increasing staff competence, comfort, safety and quality of life on inpatient units may increase job satisfaction and retention and decrease anxiety in treating these complicated patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:49Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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