Credentialing and Privileging for Clinical Nurse Specialists A "One Faculty" - "One Process" Concept

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164038
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Credentialing and Privileging for Clinical Nurse Specialists A "One Faculty" - "One Process" Concept
Author(s):
Lucas, Colleen; Flaherty-Robb, Marna; Laraia, Michele; Maylie, Ann
Author Details:
Colleen Lucas, MN, RN, CNS, APRN-BC, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Marna Flaherty-Robb, MSN, RN, CNS; Michele Laraia, PhD, RN, PMHNP, CS; Ann Maylie, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: Administrative rules regulating Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) practice in Oregon went into effect in October 2001. Consistent with national standards, the rules delineate the qualifications, scope and standards for CNS practice. Eager to be among the first to be recognized by the Oregon State Board of Nursing, Clinical Nurse Specialists at our institution applied for and obtained certification as a CNS in Oregon. The next step was to gain recognition and authorization at the institutional level to function as a licensed independent practitioner in the full scope of the CNS role. Background: In compliance with accrediting agencies, hospitals have established credentialing and privileging mechanisms for health care providers to whom practice privileges are granted. For several years, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and certified registered nurse anesthetists have been recognized in statute and at the institutional level as licensed independent practitioners. Clinical Nurse Specialists have traditionally been excluded from this process. Description of Process: 1) Assessed current situation - Examined processes in place for credentialing and privileging Nurse Practitioners, Certified Nurse Midwives, Certified Nurse Anesthetists, and Medical Staff; 2) Compared current situation with desired situation - One standard process for all Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs); a consistent process for all professional staff; 3) Agreed on overall concept of "One Faculty" for all APNs - Recruit and hire; review role/ scope of practice; oversee quality and standards of practice; use research findings in practice; 4) Defined the new process - Involved stakeholders from Hospitals and Clinics, Medical Staff Office, School of Nursing, and School of Medicine; 5) Delineated goals and benefits of ONE credentialing and privileging process. Outcome: A well-defined standard process was implemented Fall, 2003 for all professional staff. The development of the process resulted from reaching agreements on how the process should be conducted across the School of Medicine, the Hospitals and Clinics, and the School of Nursing. Expected outcomes are increased compliance with credentialing standards; alignment with performance evaluation; and quality oversight by the discipline. Implications for CNS Practice: The development of a credentialing and privileging for CNSs, provides CNSs with institutional recognition for the full scope of their role while simultaneously providing professional development opportunities and quality oversight by the discipline.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCredentialing and Privileging for Clinical Nurse Specialists A "One Faculty" - "One Process" Concepten_GB
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Colleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorFlaherty-Robb, Marnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaraia, Micheleen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaylie, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsColleen Lucas, MN, RN, CNS, APRN-BC, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Marna Flaherty-Robb, MSN, RN, CNS; Michele Laraia, PhD, RN, PMHNP, CS; Ann Maylie, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164038-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Administrative rules regulating Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) practice in Oregon went into effect in October 2001. Consistent with national standards, the rules delineate the qualifications, scope and standards for CNS practice. Eager to be among the first to be recognized by the Oregon State Board of Nursing, Clinical Nurse Specialists at our institution applied for and obtained certification as a CNS in Oregon. The next step was to gain recognition and authorization at the institutional level to function as a licensed independent practitioner in the full scope of the CNS role. Background: In compliance with accrediting agencies, hospitals have established credentialing and privileging mechanisms for health care providers to whom practice privileges are granted. For several years, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and certified registered nurse anesthetists have been recognized in statute and at the institutional level as licensed independent practitioners. Clinical Nurse Specialists have traditionally been excluded from this process. Description of Process: 1) Assessed current situation - Examined processes in place for credentialing and privileging Nurse Practitioners, Certified Nurse Midwives, Certified Nurse Anesthetists, and Medical Staff; 2) Compared current situation with desired situation - One standard process for all Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs); a consistent process for all professional staff; 3) Agreed on overall concept of "One Faculty" for all APNs - Recruit and hire; review role/ scope of practice; oversee quality and standards of practice; use research findings in practice; 4) Defined the new process - Involved stakeholders from Hospitals and Clinics, Medical Staff Office, School of Nursing, and School of Medicine; 5) Delineated goals and benefits of ONE credentialing and privileging process. Outcome: A well-defined standard process was implemented Fall, 2003 for all professional staff. The development of the process resulted from reaching agreements on how the process should be conducted across the School of Medicine, the Hospitals and Clinics, and the School of Nursing. Expected outcomes are increased compliance with credentialing standards; alignment with performance evaluation; and quality oversight by the discipline. Implications for CNS Practice: The development of a credentialing and privileging for CNSs, provides CNSs with institutional recognition for the full scope of their role while simultaneously providing professional development opportunities and quality oversight by the discipline.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:50Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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