2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164040
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Black Cohosh as a Treatment of Menopausal Hot Flashes: Implication for the CNS
Author(s):
McCracken Inman, Gretchen; Martin, Anne W.; Dormire, Sharon
Author Details:
Gretchen McCracken Inman, BA, RN, Student, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Anne W. Martin, MSSW, RN, Student; Sharon Dormire, PhD, RN, Faculty Advisor
Abstract:
[Student Abstract] Problem: By 2010, approximately 50% of all women will be menopausal. Currently, 80% of women experience hot flashes. Evidence suggests that black cohosh is the most extensively studied and widely used herbal therapy for hot flashes. Purpose: To critique literature on black cohosh as a hot flash remedy. Safety and efficacy are reported in order to provide the CNS with current knowledge and practice guidelines. Significance: Since publication of the Women's Health Initiative, more women are seeking alternative therapies for symptom relief. The CNS plays an integral role in patient education, facilitating individual clients in making sound decisions about menopause, based on current clinical evidence. Methods: A literature review of clinical trails on black cohosh through the use of medical, nursing, and alternative health electronic data bases was conducted. Additionally, the current investigators in black cohosh studies were contacted for input. GlaxoSmithKline provided additional publications. Description of Analysis: The literature suggests that black cohosh may be effective in the treatment of hot flashes. Clinical trails have not found toxicity, major adverse effects, or drug interactions except for potential interaction with Tomoxifen. Although recent studies suggest that that the herb does not have estrogenic effects, further investigation is recommended. Implication for Nursing Practice: Black cohosh can be a useful treatment alternative for some women; however, caution is warranted for use in patients with estrogen sensitive cancers. Black cohosh is not yet indicated for the treatment of other menopausal issues such as cardiovascular and bone health.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlack Cohosh as a Treatment of Menopausal Hot Flashes: Implication for the CNSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCracken Inman, Gretchenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Anne W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDormire, Sharonen_US
dc.author.detailsGretchen McCracken Inman, BA, RN, Student, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Anne W. Martin, MSSW, RN, Student; Sharon Dormire, PhD, RN, Faculty Advisoren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164040-
dc.description.abstract[Student Abstract] Problem: By 2010, approximately 50% of all women will be menopausal. Currently, 80% of women experience hot flashes. Evidence suggests that black cohosh is the most extensively studied and widely used herbal therapy for hot flashes. Purpose: To critique literature on black cohosh as a hot flash remedy. Safety and efficacy are reported in order to provide the CNS with current knowledge and practice guidelines. Significance: Since publication of the Women's Health Initiative, more women are seeking alternative therapies for symptom relief. The CNS plays an integral role in patient education, facilitating individual clients in making sound decisions about menopause, based on current clinical evidence. Methods: A literature review of clinical trails on black cohosh through the use of medical, nursing, and alternative health electronic data bases was conducted. Additionally, the current investigators in black cohosh studies were contacted for input. GlaxoSmithKline provided additional publications. Description of Analysis: The literature suggests that black cohosh may be effective in the treatment of hot flashes. Clinical trails have not found toxicity, major adverse effects, or drug interactions except for potential interaction with Tomoxifen. Although recent studies suggest that that the herb does not have estrogenic effects, further investigation is recommended. Implication for Nursing Practice: Black cohosh can be a useful treatment alternative for some women; however, caution is warranted for use in patients with estrogen sensitive cancers. Black cohosh is not yet indicated for the treatment of other menopausal issues such as cardiovascular and bone health.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:52Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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