2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164042
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Masterful Precepting: Strategies to Help Nurses BECOME . . .
Author(s):
Modic, Mary Beth
Author Details:
Mary Beth Modic, RN-BC, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose/Objectives: Healthcare organizations are continually challenged to provide orientation to new staff while providing care to complex patients. The preceptor concept first appeared in the literature in the late 1970's. Most acute care facilities utilize the preceptor method when orienting new staff. Much attention and resources are given to initial preceptor education; however, continued preceptor development is often neglected. The purpose of this project was to enhance the orientation process by refining preceptor's teaching and feedback skills. Background/Rationale: The literature contains little information about continued skill development of the preceptor. Support groups consisting of new and experienced nurses have identified the need for sophistication and refinement of teaching and feedback skills. Effective preceptors are important in retention of new nurses and in job satisfaction of seasoned nurses. Project Description: BECOME is an acronym for a variety of successful teaching strategies. Using the BECOME techniques, preceptors are equipped with principles that foster learning. Methods: A four hour preceptor enrichment course was offered to experienced preceptors to acquaint them with the BECOME methodology. Preceptors were provided with videotaped scenarios and invited to apply the strategy to the scenarios. Application of the BECOME techniques to the challenging learner was also examined. Dialogue was encouraged between the preceptor groups. Outcomes: 163 preceptors from 42 units attended the course reflecting all nursing specialties at the organization. Course evaluations rated the BECOME method and feedback opportunities as most helpful in improving their teaching techniques. New practices were implemented as a result of course participation. Conclusion: Being a preceptor is challenging for a variety of factors. These include number of orientees and available preceptors, complexity of patients, skill set of orientees, unit culture, and organizational commitment. Continued development and support of preceptors is necessary for an effective preceptor program. Implications for Practice: The CNS witnesses first hand the obstacles encountered by preceptors. Due to the enormous responsibilities of the bedside nurse, orientation is often relegated to the "See one, do one, teach one" method. The BECOME method provides an enriching framework for preceptors to utilize when orienting new nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMasterful Precepting: Strategies to Help Nurses BECOME . . .en_GB
dc.contributor.authorModic, Mary Bethen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Beth Modic, RN-BC, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164042-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Objectives: Healthcare organizations are continually challenged to provide orientation to new staff while providing care to complex patients. The preceptor concept first appeared in the literature in the late 1970's. Most acute care facilities utilize the preceptor method when orienting new staff. Much attention and resources are given to initial preceptor education; however, continued preceptor development is often neglected. The purpose of this project was to enhance the orientation process by refining preceptor's teaching and feedback skills. Background/Rationale: The literature contains little information about continued skill development of the preceptor. Support groups consisting of new and experienced nurses have identified the need for sophistication and refinement of teaching and feedback skills. Effective preceptors are important in retention of new nurses and in job satisfaction of seasoned nurses. Project Description: BECOME is an acronym for a variety of successful teaching strategies. Using the BECOME techniques, preceptors are equipped with principles that foster learning. Methods: A four hour preceptor enrichment course was offered to experienced preceptors to acquaint them with the BECOME methodology. Preceptors were provided with videotaped scenarios and invited to apply the strategy to the scenarios. Application of the BECOME techniques to the challenging learner was also examined. Dialogue was encouraged between the preceptor groups. Outcomes: 163 preceptors from 42 units attended the course reflecting all nursing specialties at the organization. Course evaluations rated the BECOME method and feedback opportunities as most helpful in improving their teaching techniques. New practices were implemented as a result of course participation. Conclusion: Being a preceptor is challenging for a variety of factors. These include number of orientees and available preceptors, complexity of patients, skill set of orientees, unit culture, and organizational commitment. Continued development and support of preceptors is necessary for an effective preceptor program. Implications for Practice: The CNS witnesses first hand the obstacles encountered by preceptors. Due to the enormous responsibilities of the bedside nurse, orientation is often relegated to the "See one, do one, teach one" method. The BECOME method provides an enriching framework for preceptors to utilize when orienting new nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:40:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:40:54Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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