The CNS as Change Agent: Impacting Safety Through The Implementation of an IV Medication Delivery System

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164053
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The CNS as Change Agent: Impacting Safety Through The Implementation of an IV Medication Delivery System
Author(s):
Steingass, Sharon K.
Author Details:
Sharon K. Steingass, RN, MSN, AOCN, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Problem: The impact of medication errors may consequential and result in the patient needing a higher level of care or death. Purpose: To provide a framework for the implementation of an intravenous (IV) medication delivery system in order to reduce medication error and enhance patient safety. Background/Rationale: The risk of harm caused by medical care has increased awareness and scrutiny by the public and accreditation agencies in the past decade. Implementation of systems that will reduce medication errors is a priority issue for healthcare organizations. The CNS with the clinical knowledge and change agent skills is an ideal leader for the implementation of technology and systems that will reduce medication errors. Significance/Justification: It is estimated that 38% of medication errors occur at the point of administration and documentation. The most common errors have been reported to occur at the point of programming intravenous infusion devices. Practice Innovation: Technology and culture have been defined as key elements to impact patient safety. Technology has been developed to reduce the rate of error in three ways: prevention, facilitating a rapid response after an adverse event has occurred and tracking and providing feedback about actual or potential adverse events. Newer technology and software has allowed IV delivery systems to be designed to reduce errors by enhancing prevention features and adding the ability to provide tracking and feedback. Implementation of these enhanced systems requires a team approach, which include nursing, pharmacy and biomedical support. The Alaris Medley medication delivery system with Guardrails allows the hospital through a defined drug library to establish intravenous medication dose parameters for defined patient populations based on the hospitals best practices. This system guides the nurse at the point of administration, tracks programming events which can be reviewed at prescribed intervals, and allows the organization an opportunity to gain insight into system, practice or knowledge issues. Evaluation: Successful implementation of this new technology as well as data obtained from the initial download of the continuous quality data set will be reviewed to evaluate effectiveness of the drug library and Guardrails system. Implications for practice: The cost of technology to address medication error management and patient safety has required organizations to carefully consider and plan for in order to achieve successful implementation, assure return on investment as well as enhance patient quality. Employing the CNS role, as change agent, offers organizations an opportunity to implement technology in a fiscally responsible manner.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe CNS as Change Agent: Impacting Safety Through The Implementation of an IV Medication Delivery Systemen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSteingass, Sharon K.en_US
dc.author.detailsSharon K. Steingass, RN, MSN, AOCN, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164053-
dc.description.abstractProblem: The impact of medication errors may consequential and result in the patient needing a higher level of care or death. Purpose: To provide a framework for the implementation of an intravenous (IV) medication delivery system in order to reduce medication error and enhance patient safety. Background/Rationale: The risk of harm caused by medical care has increased awareness and scrutiny by the public and accreditation agencies in the past decade. Implementation of systems that will reduce medication errors is a priority issue for healthcare organizations. The CNS with the clinical knowledge and change agent skills is an ideal leader for the implementation of technology and systems that will reduce medication errors. Significance/Justification: It is estimated that 38% of medication errors occur at the point of administration and documentation. The most common errors have been reported to occur at the point of programming intravenous infusion devices. Practice Innovation: Technology and culture have been defined as key elements to impact patient safety. Technology has been developed to reduce the rate of error in three ways: prevention, facilitating a rapid response after an adverse event has occurred and tracking and providing feedback about actual or potential adverse events. Newer technology and software has allowed IV delivery systems to be designed to reduce errors by enhancing prevention features and adding the ability to provide tracking and feedback. Implementation of these enhanced systems requires a team approach, which include nursing, pharmacy and biomedical support. The Alaris Medley medication delivery system with Guardrails allows the hospital through a defined drug library to establish intravenous medication dose parameters for defined patient populations based on the hospitals best practices. This system guides the nurse at the point of administration, tracks programming events which can be reviewed at prescribed intervals, and allows the organization an opportunity to gain insight into system, practice or knowledge issues. Evaluation: Successful implementation of this new technology as well as data obtained from the initial download of the continuous quality data set will be reviewed to evaluate effectiveness of the drug library and Guardrails system. Implications for practice: The cost of technology to address medication error management and patient safety has required organizations to carefully consider and plan for in order to achieve successful implementation, assure return on investment as well as enhance patient quality. Employing the CNS role, as change agent, offers organizations an opportunity to implement technology in a fiscally responsible manner.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:41:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:41:07Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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