2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164067
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Delirium in Critical Care: Recognizing and Managing to Improve Patient Outcomes
Author(s):
Bassett, Rick
Author Details:
Rick Bassett, MS, RN, CCRN, St. Luke's Hospital, Boise, Idaho, USA, email: bassettr@slhs.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine the knowledge and awareness of delirium among ICU providers with respect to recognition, impact and management in order to raise awareness to and improve recognition of ICU delirium among ICU providers. SIGNIFICANCE: ICU delirium is recognized as a significant contributor to adverse ICU and hospital outcomes. Research in this area has grown over the last 5 years. It has shown the considerable impact of delirium on patient outcomes resulting in the creation of objective ICU delirium assessment tools like the CAM-ICU. Delirium has been correlated as a strong, independent predictor of prolonged length of stay, re-intubation, higher mortality, and cost of care. BACKGROUND/RARIONALE: St. Luke's Boise and Meridian Medical Centers and other hospitals nationwide joined together in the Critical Care Innovation Network (CCIN), a coalition of VHA hospitals, to address ICU delirium and improve clinical outcomes by increasing clinician awareness and recognition. A subgroup was formed to create a survey tool designed to evaluate knowledge in three areas, recognition, impact and treatment. DESCRIPTION: Retrospective analysis of a multi-center, multidisciplinary, prospectively collected database of 608 respondents based on results from the survey that was distributed to RNs, RTs, MDs, PAs and NPs in 21 critical care units within 12 hospitals throughout the United States to assess their knowledge awareness of ICU delirium. Survey results were analyzed as both cohort and unit specific data. Outcome: Providers showed clear deficiencies in their knowledge of the impact of ICU delirium on their patients and often underestimated the impact. Knowledge, with respect to recognition and risk factors, was limited. Additionally, many responses regarding appropriate management strategies for ICU delirium were incorrect. Interpretation/Conclusion: This multi-center, multi-disciplinary survey project revealed significant deficiencies in the knowledge of critical care providers with regard to the recognition of ICU delirium, its risk factors, the impact and appropriate interventions to decrease the incidence and/or duration of ICU delirium. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Working with the interdisciplinary healthcare team the Clinical Nurse Specialist is key in identifying clinical practice improvement opportunities and evaluating applicable evidence-based practice and validated tools in an effort to decrease the incidence and impact of ICU delirium in their organization.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDelirium in Critical Care: Recognizing and Managing to Improve Patient Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBassett, Ricken_US
dc.author.detailsRick Bassett, MS, RN, CCRN, St. Luke's Hospital, Boise, Idaho, USA, email: bassettr@slhs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164067-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To determine the knowledge and awareness of delirium among ICU providers with respect to recognition, impact and management in order to raise awareness to and improve recognition of ICU delirium among ICU providers. SIGNIFICANCE: ICU delirium is recognized as a significant contributor to adverse ICU and hospital outcomes. Research in this area has grown over the last 5 years. It has shown the considerable impact of delirium on patient outcomes resulting in the creation of objective ICU delirium assessment tools like the CAM-ICU. Delirium has been correlated as a strong, independent predictor of prolonged length of stay, re-intubation, higher mortality, and cost of care. BACKGROUND/RARIONALE: St. Luke's Boise and Meridian Medical Centers and other hospitals nationwide joined together in the Critical Care Innovation Network (CCIN), a coalition of VHA hospitals, to address ICU delirium and improve clinical outcomes by increasing clinician awareness and recognition. A subgroup was formed to create a survey tool designed to evaluate knowledge in three areas, recognition, impact and treatment. DESCRIPTION: Retrospective analysis of a multi-center, multidisciplinary, prospectively collected database of 608 respondents based on results from the survey that was distributed to RNs, RTs, MDs, PAs and NPs in 21 critical care units within 12 hospitals throughout the United States to assess their knowledge awareness of ICU delirium. Survey results were analyzed as both cohort and unit specific data. Outcome: Providers showed clear deficiencies in their knowledge of the impact of ICU delirium on their patients and often underestimated the impact. Knowledge, with respect to recognition and risk factors, was limited. Additionally, many responses regarding appropriate management strategies for ICU delirium were incorrect. Interpretation/Conclusion: This multi-center, multi-disciplinary survey project revealed significant deficiencies in the knowledge of critical care providers with regard to the recognition of ICU delirium, its risk factors, the impact and appropriate interventions to decrease the incidence and/or duration of ICU delirium. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Working with the interdisciplinary healthcare team the Clinical Nurse Specialist is key in identifying clinical practice improvement opportunities and evaluating applicable evidence-based practice and validated tools in an effort to decrease the incidence and impact of ICU delirium in their organization.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:41:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:41:23Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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