2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164070
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Speak Up for patient care quality improvements through peer review
Author(s):
Brim, Carla
Author Details:
Carla Brim, MN PHCNS-BC CEN, St. John Medical Center, Longview, Washington, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: Develop a process for staff to recommend patient quality care situations for review as a means to improve both patient safety and systems processes. The secondary goal is to improve staff communication skills and professional behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE: The Institute of Medicine's 1999 publication of To Err is Human" has spurred the development of several quality and safety initiatives. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement launched the 100K lives campaign. The Joint Commission has an annual list of national patient safety goals targeting safe patient care practices. Additionally, the Joint Commission link the root cause of most sentinel events to breaks in communication. While these programs focus on system initiatives, the need for staff members to recognize and act on patient quality care concerns must be addressed on a unit -level to foster a culture of safety. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: This community hospital's shared governance clinical practice team formed two years ago. The team has developed several protocols and implemented practice changes. The team selected peer review as a method to improve patient quality care. DESCRIPTION: An overview of peer review was presented to the emergency department staff during a staff meeting. A simple electronic form was created for case submission. The cases were screened by both clinical manager and clinical nurse specialist (CNS) for appropriateness. The case was then presented to the clinical practice team for final review and approval of peer review. Once approved the staff involved in the case were called together to search for areas of success and opportunities. The crucial conversations framework was used during case presentations. OUTCOME: Ten cases have been submitted for review. Two were addressed at the system level. One was an individual performance problem. The remaining seven cases were successfully reviewed by the staff. The outcomes identified ranged from educational opportunities to recognition of outdated policies. Initial reaction to peer review was cautious. Providing safety for the staff during case review sessions was essential to success of the project. This continues to be a successful program for this team. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: Patient quality care outcomes are improved when staff are involved in recognizing the areas that need improvement. Potential near misses and system failures were identified prior to untoward patient events as a result of the staff case reviews. The improvement in professionalism and communication by an empowered staff are a secondary gain of the peer review process. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The use of peer review offers the CNS an opportunity to present patient care situations as educational opportunities. Through this venue constructive feedback is modeled, root causes are explored and process improvements identified. Non-punitive peer review fosters a culture of safety to "speak up" about near misses or system failures.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpeak Up for patient care quality improvements through peer reviewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrim, Carlaen_US
dc.author.detailsCarla Brim, MN PHCNS-BC CEN, St. John Medical Center, Longview, Washington, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164070-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: Develop a process for staff to recommend patient quality care situations for review as a means to improve both patient safety and systems processes. The secondary goal is to improve staff communication skills and professional behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE: The Institute of Medicine's 1999 publication of To Err is Human" has spurred the development of several quality and safety initiatives. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement launched the 100K lives campaign. The Joint Commission has an annual list of national patient safety goals targeting safe patient care practices. Additionally, the Joint Commission link the root cause of most sentinel events to breaks in communication. While these programs focus on system initiatives, the need for staff members to recognize and act on patient quality care concerns must be addressed on a unit -level to foster a culture of safety. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: This community hospital's shared governance clinical practice team formed two years ago. The team has developed several protocols and implemented practice changes. The team selected peer review as a method to improve patient quality care. DESCRIPTION: An overview of peer review was presented to the emergency department staff during a staff meeting. A simple electronic form was created for case submission. The cases were screened by both clinical manager and clinical nurse specialist (CNS) for appropriateness. The case was then presented to the clinical practice team for final review and approval of peer review. Once approved the staff involved in the case were called together to search for areas of success and opportunities. The crucial conversations framework was used during case presentations. OUTCOME: Ten cases have been submitted for review. Two were addressed at the system level. One was an individual performance problem. The remaining seven cases were successfully reviewed by the staff. The outcomes identified ranged from educational opportunities to recognition of outdated policies. Initial reaction to peer review was cautious. Providing safety for the staff during case review sessions was essential to success of the project. This continues to be a successful program for this team. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: Patient quality care outcomes are improved when staff are involved in recognizing the areas that need improvement. Potential near misses and system failures were identified prior to untoward patient events as a result of the staff case reviews. The improvement in professionalism and communication by an empowered staff are a secondary gain of the peer review process. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The use of peer review offers the CNS an opportunity to present patient care situations as educational opportunities. Through this venue constructive feedback is modeled, root causes are explored and process improvements identified. Non-punitive peer review fosters a culture of safety to "speak up" about near misses or system failures.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:41:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:41:27Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.