2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164073
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Nurse Specialist and Administrator Perceptions of Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice
Author(s):
Darmody, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Darmody, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Nursing, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: darmodyj@uwm.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this research was to compare CNS and Administrator perceptions of CNS practice in acute care settings. The specific objectives were to describe CNS responsibility within the organization and to compare CNS and administrator perspectives on the most important activities and outcomes of CNS practice. SIGNIFICANCE: Relationships with key personnel, especially administrators who supervise and evaluate the CNS, is an important variable that can constrain or facilitate CNS practice within the organization. There has been limited information available comparing the perspectives of CNSs and Administrators about CNS practice in acute care. DESIGN: This was a descriptive study that utilized questionnaires to compare CNS and Administrator perceptions of acute care CNS practice. The questionnaires were developed based on the literature and content review by experts. Methods: CNS participants (n=30) and Administrator participants (n=7) were recruited from four health care organizations in the Midwestern United States. CNS participants completed a questionnaire that included information about their a) education and experience, b) current responsibilities, and c) perceptions about the most important activities and outcomes of their practice. Administrator participants completed a questionnaire that included information about a) the nursing organization, b) CNSs employed, and c) perceptions about the most important activities and outcomes of CNS practice. FINDINGS: There was variability across organizations related to reporting relationships and the structure of CNS work. No significant differences were found when comparing CNS and Administrator perceptions of the importance often activities and seven outcomes. There was agreement that the most important CNS activities included developing clinical protocols and guidelines, quality improvement, and coordination of care. There was agreement that the most important outcomes included evidence-based nursing care and skilled and competent nursing staff. CONCLUSIONS: A positive finding in this study was the agreement of CNSs and Administrators about the most important CNS activities and outcomes. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Agreement of CNSs and Administrators on the most important CNS activities and outcomes provides a foundation to facilitate priority setting, outcome measurement, and analysis of the effect of CNS practice on clinical and fiscal outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Nurse Specialist and Administrator Perceptions of Clinical Nurse Specialist Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDarmody, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Darmody, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Nursing, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: darmodyj@uwm.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164073-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this research was to compare CNS and Administrator perceptions of CNS practice in acute care settings. The specific objectives were to describe CNS responsibility within the organization and to compare CNS and administrator perspectives on the most important activities and outcomes of CNS practice. SIGNIFICANCE: Relationships with key personnel, especially administrators who supervise and evaluate the CNS, is an important variable that can constrain or facilitate CNS practice within the organization. There has been limited information available comparing the perspectives of CNSs and Administrators about CNS practice in acute care. DESIGN: This was a descriptive study that utilized questionnaires to compare CNS and Administrator perceptions of acute care CNS practice. The questionnaires were developed based on the literature and content review by experts. Methods: CNS participants (n=30) and Administrator participants (n=7) were recruited from four health care organizations in the Midwestern United States. CNS participants completed a questionnaire that included information about their a) education and experience, b) current responsibilities, and c) perceptions about the most important activities and outcomes of their practice. Administrator participants completed a questionnaire that included information about a) the nursing organization, b) CNSs employed, and c) perceptions about the most important activities and outcomes of CNS practice. FINDINGS: There was variability across organizations related to reporting relationships and the structure of CNS work. No significant differences were found when comparing CNS and Administrator perceptions of the importance often activities and seven outcomes. There was agreement that the most important CNS activities included developing clinical protocols and guidelines, quality improvement, and coordination of care. There was agreement that the most important outcomes included evidence-based nursing care and skilled and competent nursing staff. CONCLUSIONS: A positive finding in this study was the agreement of CNSs and Administrators about the most important CNS activities and outcomes. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Agreement of CNSs and Administrators on the most important CNS activities and outcomes provides a foundation to facilitate priority setting, outcome measurement, and analysis of the effect of CNS practice on clinical and fiscal outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:41:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:41:31Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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