The Public/Community Health Clinical Nurse Specialist: A Pilot RCT Testing the Effect of Structured Writing with Seropositive African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164074
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Public/Community Health Clinical Nurse Specialist: A Pilot RCT Testing the Effect of Structured Writing with Seropositive African American Women
Author(s):
DeMarco, Rosanna
Author Details:
Rosanna DeMarco, PhD, RN, PHCNS-BC, ACRN, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: demarcro@bc.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To test the efficacy of a structured writing intervention called Sistah Powah with seropositive African American Women. SIGNIFICANCE: The HIV epidemic has disproportionately affected heterosexual African American women in the United States. There are very few interventions that target HIV-positive African American women with complex histories of childhood sexual abuse, interpersonal violence, depression among other chronic mental health challenges, and substance addiction and recovery cycles by using writing as a way to disclose emotions related to these experiences, i.e., disclosure linkages to psychological and physical health. DESIGN: RCT pre and post test design at 6 weeks and 6 months, guided by the Ecological Model (Bronfenbrenner, 1979; 2004) and the Theory of Silencing the Self (Jack, 1991). Outcome measures included safe sex expectancy (behaviors, intentions, attitudes), self-advocacy, healthcare adherence, and stigma. METHODS: Comparisons were made of paired 6-session interventions, i.e., structured writing using film clips of a commissioned local film called Women's Voices Women's Lives as a focal point and usual care support group. Outcomes measures were collected at week 1, week 6, and 6 months. FINDINGS: Attrition at 10% in a hard to reach and retain sample, (n=65). Positive effects across time on selected outcomes: Silencing the SelfTl-T2 (p=.04) and T1-T3 (p=.05); Safe Sex Expectancy, Tl to T2 (p=.02), Tl to T3 (p=.05). Healthcare adherence showed no significant difference. However, in relation to condom use frequency for the entire sample: 62% of sample (n=40) use condoms more than 70% of the time; 43% of sample (n=28) use condoms all of the time. In relation to safe sex practices if not using condoms: 50% (n=33) of sample more than 70% of the time; 33% (n=22) all of the time. CONCLUSIONS: Although the intervention affected self advocacy in sexual relationships and safe sex expectancy, there is less than 100% use (all of the time/consistent) of condoms and safe sex practices. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: These findings highlight the importance of addressing skill-building with structured writing as a way to boost the effect of perceived behaviors and expectancy over time.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Public/Community Health Clinical Nurse Specialist: A Pilot RCT Testing the Effect of Structured Writing with Seropositive African American Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDeMarco, Rosannaen_US
dc.author.detailsRosanna DeMarco, PhD, RN, PHCNS-BC, ACRN, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: demarcro@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164074-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To test the efficacy of a structured writing intervention called Sistah Powah with seropositive African American Women. SIGNIFICANCE: The HIV epidemic has disproportionately affected heterosexual African American women in the United States. There are very few interventions that target HIV-positive African American women with complex histories of childhood sexual abuse, interpersonal violence, depression among other chronic mental health challenges, and substance addiction and recovery cycles by using writing as a way to disclose emotions related to these experiences, i.e., disclosure linkages to psychological and physical health. DESIGN: RCT pre and post test design at 6 weeks and 6 months, guided by the Ecological Model (Bronfenbrenner, 1979; 2004) and the Theory of Silencing the Self (Jack, 1991). Outcome measures included safe sex expectancy (behaviors, intentions, attitudes), self-advocacy, healthcare adherence, and stigma. METHODS: Comparisons were made of paired 6-session interventions, i.e., structured writing using film clips of a commissioned local film called Women's Voices Women's Lives as a focal point and usual care support group. Outcomes measures were collected at week 1, week 6, and 6 months. FINDINGS: Attrition at 10% in a hard to reach and retain sample, (n=65). Positive effects across time on selected outcomes: Silencing the SelfTl-T2 (p=.04) and T1-T3 (p=.05); Safe Sex Expectancy, Tl to T2 (p=.02), Tl to T3 (p=.05). Healthcare adherence showed no significant difference. However, in relation to condom use frequency for the entire sample: 62% of sample (n=40) use condoms more than 70% of the time; 43% of sample (n=28) use condoms all of the time. In relation to safe sex practices if not using condoms: 50% (n=33) of sample more than 70% of the time; 33% (n=22) all of the time. CONCLUSIONS: Although the intervention affected self advocacy in sexual relationships and safe sex expectancy, there is less than 100% use (all of the time/consistent) of condoms and safe sex practices. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: These findings highlight the importance of addressing skill-building with structured writing as a way to boost the effect of perceived behaviors and expectancy over time.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:41:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:41:32Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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