Implementing the Clinical Nurse Specialist role using a matrix management approach: Opportunities and Challenges

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164084
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementing the Clinical Nurse Specialist role using a matrix management approach: Opportunities and Challenges
Author(s):
Harwood, Kerry; Apter, Janet; Fulcher, Caryl; Love, Alene; Stewart, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Kerry Harwood, MSN, RN, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: kerry.harwood@duke.edu; Janet Apter, MSN, RN; Caryl Fulcher, MSN, CNS-BC; Alene Love, MA, RN; Elizabeth Stewart, MSN, RN
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: The CNS role has been positioned within organizations in myriad ways. We have thoughtfully built a structure to support the CNS role within an academic medical center. This presentation will describe the structure, rationale, benefits, challenges and lessons learned from a centralized department of advanced clinical practice. SIGNIFICANCE: Strategically positioning the CNS role can have positive outcomes for the CNS and the organization. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: Factors identified as helpful in CNS role development include role models and peer support, tailored orientation, and ongoing educational opportunities. (Bamford & Gibson, 2000) The structure of a centralized Department of Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP) using a Team Leader model has been instrumental in the ability to support and strengthen the CNS role. DESCRIPTION: Using a matrix management approach, each CNS has a CNS Team Leader as their primary supervisor and a dotted line relationship with leadership from the relevant clinical area. New roles are developed collaboratively, with significant ACP input into preparing the environment for the role. Annual development planning is done combining expectations of both the ACP Balanced Score Card (BSC) and the Clinical Service Unit (CSU). This structure has allowed us to 1) ensure appropriate scope of practice and consistency in job descriptions, 2) foster equitable salary setting, 3) promote effective interviewing techniques, 4) provide a tailored orientation, 5) provide structured development / continuing education opportunities, 6) foster collaborative goal-setting and strategic planning, 7) advocate for advanced practice roles, and 8) promote collaboration and utilization of advanced practice resources. Some challenges have been identified, including 1) balancing organization-wide versus unit-based demands for the CNS's time and 2) clarifying role responsibilities between CNS and others involved in staff development. OUTCOME: The strengthening of CNS role socialization through centralized reporting has increased CNS satisfaction and leadership in the organization, and promoted optimal role utilization and measurement of outcomes. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: A centralized CNS reporting structure, utilizing CNS Team Leaders, can result in a highly functional, satisfying resource for the organization. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This presentation will result in an understanding of matrix management within a service line environment and its benefits for the CNS role.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementing the Clinical Nurse Specialist role using a matrix management approach: Opportunities and Challengesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarwood, Kerryen_US
dc.contributor.authorApter, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorFulcher, Carylen_US
dc.contributor.authorLove, Aleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsKerry Harwood, MSN, RN, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: kerry.harwood@duke.edu; Janet Apter, MSN, RN; Caryl Fulcher, MSN, CNS-BC; Alene Love, MA, RN; Elizabeth Stewart, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164084-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: The CNS role has been positioned within organizations in myriad ways. We have thoughtfully built a structure to support the CNS role within an academic medical center. This presentation will describe the structure, rationale, benefits, challenges and lessons learned from a centralized department of advanced clinical practice. SIGNIFICANCE: Strategically positioning the CNS role can have positive outcomes for the CNS and the organization. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: Factors identified as helpful in CNS role development include role models and peer support, tailored orientation, and ongoing educational opportunities. (Bamford & Gibson, 2000) The structure of a centralized Department of Advanced Clinical Practice (ACP) using a Team Leader model has been instrumental in the ability to support and strengthen the CNS role. DESCRIPTION: Using a matrix management approach, each CNS has a CNS Team Leader as their primary supervisor and a dotted line relationship with leadership from the relevant clinical area. New roles are developed collaboratively, with significant ACP input into preparing the environment for the role. Annual development planning is done combining expectations of both the ACP Balanced Score Card (BSC) and the Clinical Service Unit (CSU). This structure has allowed us to 1) ensure appropriate scope of practice and consistency in job descriptions, 2) foster equitable salary setting, 3) promote effective interviewing techniques, 4) provide a tailored orientation, 5) provide structured development / continuing education opportunities, 6) foster collaborative goal-setting and strategic planning, 7) advocate for advanced practice roles, and 8) promote collaboration and utilization of advanced practice resources. Some challenges have been identified, including 1) balancing organization-wide versus unit-based demands for the CNS's time and 2) clarifying role responsibilities between CNS and others involved in staff development. OUTCOME: The strengthening of CNS role socialization through centralized reporting has increased CNS satisfaction and leadership in the organization, and promoted optimal role utilization and measurement of outcomes. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: A centralized CNS reporting structure, utilizing CNS Team Leaders, can result in a highly functional, satisfying resource for the organization. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This presentation will result in an understanding of matrix management within a service line environment and its benefits for the CNS role.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:41:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:41:44Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.