Pressure Ulcer Prevention & Treatment Program: Successful Strategies Implemented by a Med/Surg Clinical Nurse Specialist

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164085
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pressure Ulcer Prevention & Treatment Program: Successful Strategies Implemented by a Med/Surg Clinical Nurse Specialist
Author(s):
Hays, Victoria
Author Details:
Victoria Hays, MN, CNS, APRN-BC, Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: victoria.hays@providence.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: Share successful strategies in the development of a pressure ulcer prevention and treatment program facilitated by a Med/Surg CNS. SIGNIFICANCE: The Med/Surg CNS at Providence Portland Medical Center, a Magnet facility, established a partnership with the WOCNs and nursing staff on IS acute care units to reduce the hospital acquired Pressure Ulcer (PU) rate from 20% to 3.8% over 36 months. As a result of this partnership, the Stage 2 and greater PU rate has decreased from 9% to 1.9%. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: This is a very important nursing quality indicator for hospitals and ties directly with the new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services no pay measure for HA PUs. In addition, Providence believes in providing excellent, cost effective care to every patient and our mission is to do no harm to our patients. DESCRIPTION: Successful strategies by the CNS include soliciting Executive and Management support to ensure pressure ulcer prevention and treatment is a priority for the facility and resources are allocated annually for this initiative. Secondly, the CNS co-facilitates with the WOCNs a monthly Skin Care Resource Nurse meeting using evidenced based practice to a group of over 30 nurses representing every acute care unit in the facility. Thirdly, under the supervision of the CNS, the WOCNs monitor 12 clinical units on a daily basis focused on prevention and treatment for Stage 2 and greater PUs. Lastly, managing the specialty support surfaces is important in the prevention and treatment of PUs. A specialty support algorithm was created and developed by the CNS and WOCNs and implemented house-wide in 2007. As a result, two years later, a cost savings of over $40,000 has resulted and nursing is confident in ensuring patients are placed on the appropriate support surface and discontinued when criteria is no longer met by the patient. OUTCOME: A reduction in the hospital acquired Pressure Ulcer (PU) rate from 20% to 3.8% over 36 months. In addition, the Stage 2 and greater PU rate has decreased from 9% to 1.9%. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: Within the past 3 years, the culture of Providence Portland Medical Center has drastically improved and staff has taken ownership of pressure ulcer rates and results on their units. Staff is deeply affected when even I patient develops a hospital acquired pressure ulcer on their unit. It is because of this culture change at Providence that the facility will achieve 0% hospital acquired pressure ulcer rate during 2009. Implications for Practice: By implementing these strategies, nursing facilities will be successful in their pressure ulcer prevention and treatment program.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePressure Ulcer Prevention & Treatment Program: Successful Strategies Implemented by a Med/Surg Clinical Nurse Specialisten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHays, Victoriaen_US
dc.author.detailsVictoria Hays, MN, CNS, APRN-BC, Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: victoria.hays@providence.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164085-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: Share successful strategies in the development of a pressure ulcer prevention and treatment program facilitated by a Med/Surg CNS. SIGNIFICANCE: The Med/Surg CNS at Providence Portland Medical Center, a Magnet facility, established a partnership with the WOCNs and nursing staff on IS acute care units to reduce the hospital acquired Pressure Ulcer (PU) rate from 20% to 3.8% over 36 months. As a result of this partnership, the Stage 2 and greater PU rate has decreased from 9% to 1.9%. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: This is a very important nursing quality indicator for hospitals and ties directly with the new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services no pay measure for HA PUs. In addition, Providence believes in providing excellent, cost effective care to every patient and our mission is to do no harm to our patients. DESCRIPTION: Successful strategies by the CNS include soliciting Executive and Management support to ensure pressure ulcer prevention and treatment is a priority for the facility and resources are allocated annually for this initiative. Secondly, the CNS co-facilitates with the WOCNs a monthly Skin Care Resource Nurse meeting using evidenced based practice to a group of over 30 nurses representing every acute care unit in the facility. Thirdly, under the supervision of the CNS, the WOCNs monitor 12 clinical units on a daily basis focused on prevention and treatment for Stage 2 and greater PUs. Lastly, managing the specialty support surfaces is important in the prevention and treatment of PUs. A specialty support algorithm was created and developed by the CNS and WOCNs and implemented house-wide in 2007. As a result, two years later, a cost savings of over $40,000 has resulted and nursing is confident in ensuring patients are placed on the appropriate support surface and discontinued when criteria is no longer met by the patient. OUTCOME: A reduction in the hospital acquired Pressure Ulcer (PU) rate from 20% to 3.8% over 36 months. In addition, the Stage 2 and greater PU rate has decreased from 9% to 1.9%. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: Within the past 3 years, the culture of Providence Portland Medical Center has drastically improved and staff has taken ownership of pressure ulcer rates and results on their units. Staff is deeply affected when even I patient develops a hospital acquired pressure ulcer on their unit. It is because of this culture change at Providence that the facility will achieve 0% hospital acquired pressure ulcer rate during 2009. Implications for Practice: By implementing these strategies, nursing facilities will be successful in their pressure ulcer prevention and treatment program.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:41:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:41:45Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.