Avoiding the Big Bailout: Clinical Nurse Specialist Role in New Product and Technology Procurement

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164089
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Avoiding the Big Bailout: Clinical Nurse Specialist Role in New Product and Technology Procurement
Author(s):
Hujcs, Marianne
Author Details:
Marianne Hujcs, MSN, RN, CCNS, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hujcsm@uphs.upenn.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To describe the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) role in the evaluation, acquisition and implementation of products and technologies designed to promote patient safety, quality patient care and improve clinical outcomes throughout a health care system. Successful strategies for procurement in the current economic climate will be discussed as well as strategies for ensuring related practice change are sustained. SIGNIFICANCE: CNSs foster safe, cost-effective patient care and are leaders in influencing practice changes in complex organizational systems. CNS competence in maintaining fiscal responsibility is necessary to achieve procurement. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: CNSs are essential in integrating evidence-based practices supported by new products, technologies and system upgrades to enhance clinical care. Given competing priorities for allocation of financial resources, fiscal responsibility necessitates linking capital expenditures with established processes that demonstrate value, clinical effectiveness and improved patient safety. In an urban quaternary academic medical center, CNSs utilize principles of value capture analysis to evaluate and acquire new products and technologies, partnering with two other entities to develop strategies to implement rapid, decentralized problem solving throughout the health care system. DESCRIPTION: Through literature review, quality indicators, standard educational programs for clinical nurses, and post-implementation monitoring of clinical and financial impact, CNSs contribute to adopting, ensuring and reviewing new innovations in care. OUTCOME: For two fiscal years, CNSs have facilitated approval of supplies, equipment and major capital purchases throughout this organization. Examples include value capture analysis procedures for intravenous catheter care supplies, infusion pumps, skin care products, integrated monitoring systems, and patient lifts. Appropriate use of new products and technologies is balanced with cost containment measures to ascertain the best possible outcomes for patients while managing resources. Monthly reports document practice enhancements for selected products and technologies, which include utilization, associated costs and resulting changes in practice. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: Effective strategies designed to validate new products and technologies facilitate organizational support and procurement. The CNS role is recognized as a necessary link to patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. In these economic times, procurement is attainable. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Maintaining fiscal responsibility and establishing collaborative relationships with non-clinical departments such as finance and administration ultimately improves patient outcome.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAvoiding the Big Bailout: Clinical Nurse Specialist Role in New Product and Technology Procurementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHujcs, Marianneen_US
dc.author.detailsMarianne Hujcs, MSN, RN, CCNS, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hujcsm@uphs.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164089-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To describe the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) role in the evaluation, acquisition and implementation of products and technologies designed to promote patient safety, quality patient care and improve clinical outcomes throughout a health care system. Successful strategies for procurement in the current economic climate will be discussed as well as strategies for ensuring related practice change are sustained. SIGNIFICANCE: CNSs foster safe, cost-effective patient care and are leaders in influencing practice changes in complex organizational systems. CNS competence in maintaining fiscal responsibility is necessary to achieve procurement. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: CNSs are essential in integrating evidence-based practices supported by new products, technologies and system upgrades to enhance clinical care. Given competing priorities for allocation of financial resources, fiscal responsibility necessitates linking capital expenditures with established processes that demonstrate value, clinical effectiveness and improved patient safety. In an urban quaternary academic medical center, CNSs utilize principles of value capture analysis to evaluate and acquire new products and technologies, partnering with two other entities to develop strategies to implement rapid, decentralized problem solving throughout the health care system. DESCRIPTION: Through literature review, quality indicators, standard educational programs for clinical nurses, and post-implementation monitoring of clinical and financial impact, CNSs contribute to adopting, ensuring and reviewing new innovations in care. OUTCOME: For two fiscal years, CNSs have facilitated approval of supplies, equipment and major capital purchases throughout this organization. Examples include value capture analysis procedures for intravenous catheter care supplies, infusion pumps, skin care products, integrated monitoring systems, and patient lifts. Appropriate use of new products and technologies is balanced with cost containment measures to ascertain the best possible outcomes for patients while managing resources. Monthly reports document practice enhancements for selected products and technologies, which include utilization, associated costs and resulting changes in practice. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: Effective strategies designed to validate new products and technologies facilitate organizational support and procurement. The CNS role is recognized as a necessary link to patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. In these economic times, procurement is attainable. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Maintaining fiscal responsibility and establishing collaborative relationships with non-clinical departments such as finance and administration ultimately improves patient outcome.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:41:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:41:49Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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