The Palpable Impact of a Clinical Nurse Specialist During Patient Rounds with a Medical Residency Program on a Medical-Oncology Unit

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164095
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Palpable Impact of a Clinical Nurse Specialist During Patient Rounds with a Medical Residency Program on a Medical-Oncology Unit
Author(s):
Merriweather, Brenda
Author Details:
Brenda Merriweather, MSN, RN, BSN, BS, Baptist Medical Center South, Montgomery, Alabama, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: Then purpose of this quality improvement project is to improve the overall quality of patient care on a 42-bed medical-oncology unit. Another goal is to improve the communication between the clinical nurse specialist (CNS), the medical residents, the nursing staff, and the patients and their family in terms of patient care. SIGNIFICANCE: Multidisciplinary rounds have been shown to facilitate quality patient care. Multidisciplinary rounds are gaining in popularity due to increasing pressure from accrediting organizations such as The Joint Commission and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. When evaluating the impact of a CNS during multidisciplinary rounds, one study found that the CNS functioned as a link to the multidisciplinary team. The CNS participated in group education, collaboration, conflict resolution and care coordination during the multidisciplinary rounds. DESIGN: In October 2008, the CNS identified a need to improve the quality of patient care and the overall communication on the medical-oncology unit. Before this time, the medical residency program functioned independent of the CNS. By working in conjunction with the medical residents, the CNS bridged the gap between the residents, nurses, patients and their families. METHODS: The methods utilized by the CNS are: Obtain a current census of the patients on the medical-oncology unit. Identify patient by name, room number and diagnosis. Review the patients History and Physical with the residents and the attending physician. Inquire about various aspects of the History and Physical for clarity. Review the diagnostic exams ordered as well as the results of these exams. Review the patient's medications. Review the diagnosis or differential diagnoses. Review the treatment plan. Make recommendations to the team regarding the diagnostic exams, medications, differential diagnosis, treatment plan, etc. Make recommendations to the team on how to facilitate physician orders. Write verbal orders for the team. Collaborate with specialists, case management, pharmacy, lab and other departments to facilitate quality patient care. Consult Case Management early for Discharge Planning. Visit the patients in their room and make recommendations based on the status of the patient and the information gathered at that time. Assess the patient globally and anticipate their needs. Ask the team what is needed from the nursing staff in terms of patient care. Discuss treatment plan and orders with the primary nurse during the rounds. Take care of patient complaints. Ensure compliance with Core Measures: Acute Myocardial Infarction, Congestive Heart Failure, Pneumonia, Anticoagulant therapy, and Influenza and Pneumonia Vaccinations. Utilize the SBAR Method Provide Patient Education Provide Nursing Education Summarize with the team before departure from the unit. FINDINGS: This model is currently in process. Based on the utilization of this model, a new communication strategy has been developed. Some potential outcomes that have been identified are: Decreased Length of Stay Decreased Readmission Rates Improved Throughput Improved Communication between patient to physician, physician to nurse, etc. Increased Patient Satisfaction Increased Nurse/Employee Satisfaction Increased Physician Satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: This model is still in process. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This model can potentially improve the quality of patient care. A model such as this one can be used on other units in the hospital. The CNS has the impact of improving patient care, developing innovative communication strategies and facilitating team building.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Palpable Impact of a Clinical Nurse Specialist During Patient Rounds with a Medical Residency Program on a Medical-Oncology Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMerriweather, Brendaen_US
dc.author.detailsBrenda Merriweather, MSN, RN, BSN, BS, Baptist Medical Center South, Montgomery, Alabama, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164095-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: Then purpose of this quality improvement project is to improve the overall quality of patient care on a 42-bed medical-oncology unit. Another goal is to improve the communication between the clinical nurse specialist (CNS), the medical residents, the nursing staff, and the patients and their family in terms of patient care. SIGNIFICANCE: Multidisciplinary rounds have been shown to facilitate quality patient care. Multidisciplinary rounds are gaining in popularity due to increasing pressure from accrediting organizations such as The Joint Commission and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. When evaluating the impact of a CNS during multidisciplinary rounds, one study found that the CNS functioned as a link to the multidisciplinary team. The CNS participated in group education, collaboration, conflict resolution and care coordination during the multidisciplinary rounds. DESIGN: In October 2008, the CNS identified a need to improve the quality of patient care and the overall communication on the medical-oncology unit. Before this time, the medical residency program functioned independent of the CNS. By working in conjunction with the medical residents, the CNS bridged the gap between the residents, nurses, patients and their families. METHODS: The methods utilized by the CNS are: Obtain a current census of the patients on the medical-oncology unit. Identify patient by name, room number and diagnosis. Review the patients History and Physical with the residents and the attending physician. Inquire about various aspects of the History and Physical for clarity. Review the diagnostic exams ordered as well as the results of these exams. Review the patient's medications. Review the diagnosis or differential diagnoses. Review the treatment plan. Make recommendations to the team regarding the diagnostic exams, medications, differential diagnosis, treatment plan, etc. Make recommendations to the team on how to facilitate physician orders. Write verbal orders for the team. Collaborate with specialists, case management, pharmacy, lab and other departments to facilitate quality patient care. Consult Case Management early for Discharge Planning. Visit the patients in their room and make recommendations based on the status of the patient and the information gathered at that time. Assess the patient globally and anticipate their needs. Ask the team what is needed from the nursing staff in terms of patient care. Discuss treatment plan and orders with the primary nurse during the rounds. Take care of patient complaints. Ensure compliance with Core Measures: Acute Myocardial Infarction, Congestive Heart Failure, Pneumonia, Anticoagulant therapy, and Influenza and Pneumonia Vaccinations. Utilize the SBAR Method Provide Patient Education Provide Nursing Education Summarize with the team before departure from the unit. FINDINGS: This model is currently in process. Based on the utilization of this model, a new communication strategy has been developed. Some potential outcomes that have been identified are: Decreased Length of Stay Decreased Readmission Rates Improved Throughput Improved Communication between patient to physician, physician to nurse, etc. Increased Patient Satisfaction Increased Nurse/Employee Satisfaction Increased Physician Satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: This model is still in process. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This model can potentially improve the quality of patient care. A model such as this one can be used on other units in the hospital. The CNS has the impact of improving patient care, developing innovative communication strategies and facilitating team building.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:41:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:41:56Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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