2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164102
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Clinical Nurse Specialist for Limb Loss Care
Author(s):
Payne, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Payne, MSN, BSN, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: payne001@mc.duke.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: This poster will describe the development of a unique advanced practice role: Limb Loss Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) at Duke University Medical Center. SIGNIFICANCE: The numbers of people with amputations are increasing dramatically, with an estimated 1.9 million people in the US living with limb loss; 70 - 80 % of whom demonstrate co-morbid diabetes and peripheral arterial disease. This population spans several medical and surgical services and requires interdisciplinary collaboration. Education, coordination, and support are essential for successful integration into living well, work, sporting and community activities. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: CNS positions have been created in many specialties to coordinate services; at our large tertiary medical center it was decided to hire an advanced practice nurse with interest and experience in orthopedics to develop resources and provide support for amputees. Patient involvement begins pre-operatively and continues throughout their treatment trajectory. DESCRIPTION: Creating this position was the first challenge, as no professional peers for benchmarking and no comprehensive standards of practice could be identified. This poster will illustrate the barriers and solutions encountered as the role functions were developed. Relationships had to be established with departments of vascular surgery, orthopedics, trauma, plastic surgery, endocrinology and general medicine, as well as discharge planning, physical and occupational therapy and prosthetic care. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers in partnership with other professionals is a new focus. Care across the continuum is a priority and services are provided to youth through geriatrics. OUTCOME: The Limb Loss CNS position has now been in place for 3 years. A much needed interdisciplinary clinic has been established and information about referrals, caseload, satisfaction and community support will be provided which demonstrate improved services for limb loss patients and their families. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: A CNS dedicated to individuals with limb loss can achieve high satisfaction in patients, families, healthcare providers and facilities. Educational materials, community support, and advocacy equip these patients for successful living after limb loss. Implications for CNS basic and Continuing Education: Others may benefit from seeing how implementation of this position was accomplished, stimulating creative use of a CNS to coordinate services for underserved patient populations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Clinical Nurse Specialist for Limb Loss Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPayne, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Payne, MSN, BSN, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: payne001@mc.duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164102-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: This poster will describe the development of a unique advanced practice role: Limb Loss Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) at Duke University Medical Center. SIGNIFICANCE: The numbers of people with amputations are increasing dramatically, with an estimated 1.9 million people in the US living with limb loss; 70 - 80 % of whom demonstrate co-morbid diabetes and peripheral arterial disease. This population spans several medical and surgical services and requires interdisciplinary collaboration. Education, coordination, and support are essential for successful integration into living well, work, sporting and community activities. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: CNS positions have been created in many specialties to coordinate services; at our large tertiary medical center it was decided to hire an advanced practice nurse with interest and experience in orthopedics to develop resources and provide support for amputees. Patient involvement begins pre-operatively and continues throughout their treatment trajectory. DESCRIPTION: Creating this position was the first challenge, as no professional peers for benchmarking and no comprehensive standards of practice could be identified. This poster will illustrate the barriers and solutions encountered as the role functions were developed. Relationships had to be established with departments of vascular surgery, orthopedics, trauma, plastic surgery, endocrinology and general medicine, as well as discharge planning, physical and occupational therapy and prosthetic care. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers in partnership with other professionals is a new focus. Care across the continuum is a priority and services are provided to youth through geriatrics. OUTCOME: The Limb Loss CNS position has now been in place for 3 years. A much needed interdisciplinary clinic has been established and information about referrals, caseload, satisfaction and community support will be provided which demonstrate improved services for limb loss patients and their families. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: A CNS dedicated to individuals with limb loss can achieve high satisfaction in patients, families, healthcare providers and facilities. Educational materials, community support, and advocacy equip these patients for successful living after limb loss. Implications for CNS basic and Continuing Education: Others may benefit from seeing how implementation of this position was accomplished, stimulating creative use of a CNS to coordinate services for underserved patient populations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:04Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.