2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164104
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transforming Organizational Culture: A Campaign for Quality End of Life Care
Author(s):
Prickel, Carmen; Treon, Michelle
Author Details:
Carmen Prickel, MSN, RN, CCRN, Indiana University Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mtreon@iupui.edu; Michelle Treon, MSN, RN, OCN
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: A needs assessment was completed and the following areas of improvement were identified: 1) to create an environment where end of life care could be delivered with compassionate, skilled nursing staff and 2) to standardize the delivery of care that was grounded in best practice and national quality standards. SIGNIFICANCE: As patient/family advocates, we felt prompted to examine the quality of care that we, as health care professionals provide for the 300+ inpatients and their families that lose their battle to a number of illnesses and disease annually. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: This project focuses on patients/families preferences, needs, and values by integrating the competencies of palliative care such as communication, symptom management, and "whole-person" care. Some challenges that were faced along the way included: continued use of aggressive treatments; lack of training for health care professionals and communication surrounding goals and plans of care; delayed access; services not well understood; and a perceived failure if unable to provide cure. Description: A strategy was created to drive the shift in the culture and beliefs of the health care providers to gain the increased buy-in that was needed. We began a campaign trail sharing what we wanted to accomplish and what changes we could make that would result an improvement in patient care. OUTCOME: Outcomes have included transferring a number of patients from the Adult Critical Care Center and reducing their cost of care, increasing utilization of flex beds to provide a consistent care location to more than 50 patients, increasing utilization of the standardized order set, creating improved documentation and coding opportunities, and better rates of enrollment into hospice services for those receiving end-of-life care. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: This project remains strong for continued development for palliative and quality end-of-life care. We continue to provide support for the use of the identified flex beds and care order set, in addition to, the multi-specialty physicians who request assistance to meet their patients' and families' needs. There is continued advocacy and growth of support for a dedicated, interdisciplinary palliative care team. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Transforming a culture through a grassroots approach engages inter-professionals and exemplifies the role of a CNS as a true change agent.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransforming Organizational Culture: A Campaign for Quality End of Life Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPrickel, Carmenen_US
dc.contributor.authorTreon, Michelleen_US
dc.author.detailsCarmen Prickel, MSN, RN, CCRN, Indiana University Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mtreon@iupui.edu; Michelle Treon, MSN, RN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164104-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: A needs assessment was completed and the following areas of improvement were identified: 1) to create an environment where end of life care could be delivered with compassionate, skilled nursing staff and 2) to standardize the delivery of care that was grounded in best practice and national quality standards. SIGNIFICANCE: As patient/family advocates, we felt prompted to examine the quality of care that we, as health care professionals provide for the 300+ inpatients and their families that lose their battle to a number of illnesses and disease annually. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: This project focuses on patients/families preferences, needs, and values by integrating the competencies of palliative care such as communication, symptom management, and "whole-person" care. Some challenges that were faced along the way included: continued use of aggressive treatments; lack of training for health care professionals and communication surrounding goals and plans of care; delayed access; services not well understood; and a perceived failure if unable to provide cure. Description: A strategy was created to drive the shift in the culture and beliefs of the health care providers to gain the increased buy-in that was needed. We began a campaign trail sharing what we wanted to accomplish and what changes we could make that would result an improvement in patient care. OUTCOME: Outcomes have included transferring a number of patients from the Adult Critical Care Center and reducing their cost of care, increasing utilization of flex beds to provide a consistent care location to more than 50 patients, increasing utilization of the standardized order set, creating improved documentation and coding opportunities, and better rates of enrollment into hospice services for those receiving end-of-life care. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: This project remains strong for continued development for palliative and quality end-of-life care. We continue to provide support for the use of the identified flex beds and care order set, in addition to, the multi-specialty physicians who request assistance to meet their patients' and families' needs. There is continued advocacy and growth of support for a dedicated, interdisciplinary palliative care team. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Transforming a culture through a grassroots approach engages inter-professionals and exemplifies the role of a CNS as a true change agent.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:06Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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