2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164111
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Contextual Factors Influencing the Acute Care Registered Nurse's Response to Alarms
Author(s):
Stacy, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Stacy, PhD, RN, CNS, CCRN, PCCN, CCNS, Palomar Pomerado Health System, Poway, California, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this qualitative study is to develop a broader understanding of the contextual factors that influence the acute care registered nurse's response to clinical alarms in the patient care setting. SIGNIFICANCE: Nurses are faced with a multitude of clinical alarms on a daily basis. There is an inherent expectation that upon hearing an alarm the nurse will immediately respond to assess the situation and initiate appropriate action to correct the problem. Yet this does not always occur. Any problem with an alarm poses a serious threat to patient safety. DESIGN: This qualitative study used an interpretive phenomenological methodology to study the lived experiences of the registered nurses who encounter clinical alarms in the medical-surgical unit. METHODS: The study was conducted in two community hospitals in southern California over a 9-week period. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 participants. A tiered schedule approach was used to facilitate concurrent analysis and refinement of the interview questions. Data saturation was achieved after the last focus group. Participants had to have at least one year of full time experience. Each focus group was audiotaped and each tape was transcribed. The transcripts were analyzed for central themes related to alarm response. FINDINGS: The sample consisted of 28 participants whose average age was 42.8 years, had been an RN for 10.9 years, and had been in their current position for 4.3 years. The majority of the sample was female (96%) and worked full time (75%) on the day shift (61%). Sixty four percent of the sample held an associate degree, 22% had a baccalaureate degree, and 14% had a master's degree. Several themes emerged from the transcript analysis. Contextual factors that influenced the nurse's response to alarms included perceived importance of the alarm, experience, unit leadership and culture, and fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: The participants in this study responded to alarms in the order of perceived importance. Factors that influenced their perception included patient safety, alleviation of pain, and patient satisfaction. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Clinical nurse specialists can use this evidence to promote safer nursing care of medical-surgical patients with regards to ever increasing technology.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContextual Factors Influencing the Acute Care Registered Nurse's Response to Alarmsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStacy, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Stacy, PhD, RN, CNS, CCRN, PCCN, CCNS, Palomar Pomerado Health System, Poway, California, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164111-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this qualitative study is to develop a broader understanding of the contextual factors that influence the acute care registered nurse's response to clinical alarms in the patient care setting. SIGNIFICANCE: Nurses are faced with a multitude of clinical alarms on a daily basis. There is an inherent expectation that upon hearing an alarm the nurse will immediately respond to assess the situation and initiate appropriate action to correct the problem. Yet this does not always occur. Any problem with an alarm poses a serious threat to patient safety. DESIGN: This qualitative study used an interpretive phenomenological methodology to study the lived experiences of the registered nurses who encounter clinical alarms in the medical-surgical unit. METHODS: The study was conducted in two community hospitals in southern California over a 9-week period. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 participants. A tiered schedule approach was used to facilitate concurrent analysis and refinement of the interview questions. Data saturation was achieved after the last focus group. Participants had to have at least one year of full time experience. Each focus group was audiotaped and each tape was transcribed. The transcripts were analyzed for central themes related to alarm response. FINDINGS: The sample consisted of 28 participants whose average age was 42.8 years, had been an RN for 10.9 years, and had been in their current position for 4.3 years. The majority of the sample was female (96%) and worked full time (75%) on the day shift (61%). Sixty four percent of the sample held an associate degree, 22% had a baccalaureate degree, and 14% had a master's degree. Several themes emerged from the transcript analysis. Contextual factors that influenced the nurse's response to alarms included perceived importance of the alarm, experience, unit leadership and culture, and fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: The participants in this study responded to alarms in the order of perceived importance. Factors that influenced their perception included patient safety, alleviation of pain, and patient satisfaction. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Clinical nurse specialists can use this evidence to promote safer nursing care of medical-surgical patients with regards to ever increasing technology.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:14Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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