Evaluating the Effect of a Pain Resource Nurse Program on Barriers to Pediatric Pain Management

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164114
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating the Effect of a Pain Resource Nurse Program on Barriers to Pediatric Pain Management
Author(s):
Turner, Helen
Author Details:
Helen Turner, DNP, RN-BC, PCNS-BC, Doernbecher Children's Hospital/Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: turnerh@ohsu.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: This program evaluation was completed to determine the effectiveness of the Pain Resource Nurse (PRN) Program for reducing barriers to optimal pediatric pain management and to describe what behaviors PRNs use to influence changes in practice as they enact their role as local pain experts. SIGNIFICANCE: Children are identified as a vulnerable population at risk for under treatment of pain. Poorly treated pain can lead to impaired healing, delayed recovery, prolonged hospitalization, exacerbation of illness or injury, and even death. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: Barriers to optimal pain management generally cluster into three areas: patients and families, healthcare providers, and health care systems. The impact of the PRN Program on these barriers has not been measured. Understanding how the PRN role is enacted will allow organizations to better plan, implement, and support PRNs. The following questions were used in evaluation: 1) Does the PRN Program decrease nurses' perceptions of barriers to pain management? 2) What behaviors do PRNs use to influence change in practice as they enact their role as pain experts? 3) Does the PRN Program improve family pain satisfaction scores? DESCRIPTION: Measures used were the Barriers to Optimal Pain Management Survey, content analysis of feedback from PRNs, and Press Ganey pain satisfaction results. Comparisons of perceived barriers and mean patient satisfaction scores were carried out pre- and post-implementation of the PRN Program. OUTCOME: Barriers related to nurses' Beliefs and Biases were decreased, Institutional Commitment/Systems Barriers were increased, and there was no change in Patient/Family Barriers. PRNs used role enactment behaviors similar to those reported in the literature (Resource, Change Agent, Role Model, and Advocate). The PRN Program did not improve patient satisfaction with pain management. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: The PRN Program can be used effectively to decrease barriers and improve pain care. Implications for Practice: Clinical practice involves maintaining and improving gains, expansion of the program to other units, engagement of physicians in decreasing systems barriers and increasing institutional commitment, and efforts to decrease patient and family barriers. Future research will include regular monitoring of barriers and satisfaction and a cost effectiveness analysis.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating the Effect of a Pain Resource Nurse Program on Barriers to Pediatric Pain Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Helenen_US
dc.author.detailsHelen Turner, DNP, RN-BC, PCNS-BC, Doernbecher Children's Hospital/Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: turnerh@ohsu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164114-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: This program evaluation was completed to determine the effectiveness of the Pain Resource Nurse (PRN) Program for reducing barriers to optimal pediatric pain management and to describe what behaviors PRNs use to influence changes in practice as they enact their role as local pain experts. SIGNIFICANCE: Children are identified as a vulnerable population at risk for under treatment of pain. Poorly treated pain can lead to impaired healing, delayed recovery, prolonged hospitalization, exacerbation of illness or injury, and even death. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: Barriers to optimal pain management generally cluster into three areas: patients and families, healthcare providers, and health care systems. The impact of the PRN Program on these barriers has not been measured. Understanding how the PRN role is enacted will allow organizations to better plan, implement, and support PRNs. The following questions were used in evaluation: 1) Does the PRN Program decrease nurses' perceptions of barriers to pain management? 2) What behaviors do PRNs use to influence change in practice as they enact their role as pain experts? 3) Does the PRN Program improve family pain satisfaction scores? DESCRIPTION: Measures used were the Barriers to Optimal Pain Management Survey, content analysis of feedback from PRNs, and Press Ganey pain satisfaction results. Comparisons of perceived barriers and mean patient satisfaction scores were carried out pre- and post-implementation of the PRN Program. OUTCOME: Barriers related to nurses' Beliefs and Biases were decreased, Institutional Commitment/Systems Barriers were increased, and there was no change in Patient/Family Barriers. PRNs used role enactment behaviors similar to those reported in the literature (Resource, Change Agent, Role Model, and Advocate). The PRN Program did not improve patient satisfaction with pain management. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: The PRN Program can be used effectively to decrease barriers and improve pain care. Implications for Practice: Clinical practice involves maintaining and improving gains, expansion of the program to other units, engagement of physicians in decreasing systems barriers and increasing institutional commitment, and efforts to decrease patient and family barriers. Future research will include regular monitoring of barriers and satisfaction and a cost effectiveness analysis.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:18Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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