2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164115
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of an Interdisciplinary Educational Program
Author(s):
Valdez, Christine; Richardson, Jenny; Schradcr, Jennifer
Author Details:
Christine Valdez, MN, RN, CNS, CNOR, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: christine.valdez@va.gov; Jenny Richardson, MS, RN, CNS; Jennifer Schradcr, BSN, RN, CPAN
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary interdepartmental educational program using high fidelity simulation on malignant hyperthermia (MH) knowledge at the Portland Veterans Medical Center. SIGNIFICANCE: A protocol for the emergent care of patients with MH was created within the Operating Room (OR). Since the syndrome is rare and the mortality rate is high, the OR staff decided to re-evaluate their plan to re-educate the staff. An interdisciplinary workgroup was formed for this purpose. A comprehensive MH plan should include all areas which care for patients during and immediately after anesthesia, so members of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) were also included. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: No policy for MH was in place that included interdisciplinary interdepartmental staff members. DESCRIPTION: The MH workgroup used resources from the Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States to prepare high fidelity an education session. A 10-item MH knowledge assessment tool was created and administered to nursing staff prior to and then following the educational sessions. The workgroup coordinated a didactic educational session followed by a mock MH drill using simulation technology. Pre- vs. post- data analysis was used to determine effectiveness of the educational intervention. OUTCOME: MH knowledge assessment scores were tallied for 93 interdisciplinary participants from the three units. The mean score increased from 56% on the pre-test to 89% on the post test. Greater than half of the participants scored 70% or higher on the post-test. More than 90% of the participants agreed or strongly agreed that simulation was a helpful learning tool. The satisfaction scores with the standard of practice for care of patients with MH improved by 42-77% in all areas. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: During analysis of the pre and post-test correct responses, identification of early signs and symptoms of MH continued to be a problem area with staff in all areas. IMPLICATIONS FOR CNS BASIC AND CONTINUING EDUCATION: Interdisciplinary collaboration on MH education programs can be beneficial in improving staff satisfaction and knowledge. The use of simulation for MH drills can contribute to positive learning outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of an Interdisciplinary Educational Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorValdez, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Jennyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchradcr, Jenniferen_US
dc.author.detailsChristine Valdez, MN, RN, CNS, CNOR, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: christine.valdez@va.gov; Jenny Richardson, MS, RN, CNS; Jennifer Schradcr, BSN, RN, CPANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164115-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary interdepartmental educational program using high fidelity simulation on malignant hyperthermia (MH) knowledge at the Portland Veterans Medical Center. SIGNIFICANCE: A protocol for the emergent care of patients with MH was created within the Operating Room (OR). Since the syndrome is rare and the mortality rate is high, the OR staff decided to re-evaluate their plan to re-educate the staff. An interdisciplinary workgroup was formed for this purpose. A comprehensive MH plan should include all areas which care for patients during and immediately after anesthesia, so members of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) were also included. BACKGROUND/RATIONALE: No policy for MH was in place that included interdisciplinary interdepartmental staff members. DESCRIPTION: The MH workgroup used resources from the Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States to prepare high fidelity an education session. A 10-item MH knowledge assessment tool was created and administered to nursing staff prior to and then following the educational sessions. The workgroup coordinated a didactic educational session followed by a mock MH drill using simulation technology. Pre- vs. post- data analysis was used to determine effectiveness of the educational intervention. OUTCOME: MH knowledge assessment scores were tallied for 93 interdisciplinary participants from the three units. The mean score increased from 56% on the pre-test to 89% on the post test. Greater than half of the participants scored 70% or higher on the post-test. More than 90% of the participants agreed or strongly agreed that simulation was a helpful learning tool. The satisfaction scores with the standard of practice for care of patients with MH improved by 42-77% in all areas. INTERPRETATION/CONCLUSION: During analysis of the pre and post-test correct responses, identification of early signs and symptoms of MH continued to be a problem area with staff in all areas. IMPLICATIONS FOR CNS BASIC AND CONTINUING EDUCATION: Interdisciplinary collaboration on MH education programs can be beneficial in improving staff satisfaction and knowledge. The use of simulation for MH drills can contribute to positive learning outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:19Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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