2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164117
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Surviving Sepsis: The Clinical Nurse Specialist as change agent
Author(s):
Winterbottom, Fiona; Rodriguez, Susan; Nash, Teresa; Jennings, Bethany; Gipson, Tina; Seoane, Leonardo; Sundell, Erik
Author Details:
Fiona Winterbottom, MSN, ACNS-BC, CCRN, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Susan Rodriguez, MSN; Teresa Nash, PharmD; Bethany Jennings, BSN; Tina Gipson, BSN; Leonardo Seoane, MD; Erik Sundell, MD
Abstract:
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the project was to evaluate standardized order sets for the management of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. SIGNIFICANCE: Sepsis is a severe illness caused by overwhelming infection. Sepsis strikes approximately 750,000 people in the U.S. and is responsible for more than 215,000 deaths annually. Mortality remains high at 28-50% at a cost of $17 billion each year. DESIGN: An interdisciplinary team was created to improve early recognition, process of care, and mortality in septic patients. A plan, do, study act, methodology was used with rapid cycle changes to improve the management of severe sepsis and septic shock. Physician and nursing education was rolled out over six months and sepsis "bundle" order sets were developed for the emergency department and ICU. All patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock were included in the protocol. METHODS: Data was collected prospectively with regards to process of care. Mortality data was collected retrospectively. FINDINGS: Early trends show improvement in outcomes for patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Results from third quarter of 2008 are: A 38% reduction in risk-adjusted mortality for sepsis in 2008 over 2007. There was a reduction in raw mortality of 57% despite a 24% increase in appropriately recognizing principle (admitting) diagnosis of Sepsis. This equates to 31 LIVES SAVED in 2008. Patients with specified "goals met" at 6 hours increased from 33% to 81%. CONCLUSIONS: Six and 24 hour bundled sepsis orders improve process of care and in-hospital mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Administrative support.tcam collaboration and structured process can lead to decreased mortality from sepsis.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
CNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Portland, Oregon, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSurviving Sepsis: The Clinical Nurse Specialist as change agenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorWinterbottom, Fionaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorNash, Teresaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJennings, Bethanyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGipson, Tinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSeoane, Leonardoen_US
dc.contributor.authorSundell, Eriken_US
dc.author.detailsFiona Winterbottom, MSN, ACNS-BC, CCRN, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Susan Rodriguez, MSN; Teresa Nash, PharmD; Bethany Jennings, BSN; Tina Gipson, BSN; Leonardo Seoane, MD; Erik Sundell, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164117-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the project was to evaluate standardized order sets for the management of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. SIGNIFICANCE: Sepsis is a severe illness caused by overwhelming infection. Sepsis strikes approximately 750,000 people in the U.S. and is responsible for more than 215,000 deaths annually. Mortality remains high at 28-50% at a cost of $17 billion each year. DESIGN: An interdisciplinary team was created to improve early recognition, process of care, and mortality in septic patients. A plan, do, study act, methodology was used with rapid cycle changes to improve the management of severe sepsis and septic shock. Physician and nursing education was rolled out over six months and sepsis "bundle" order sets were developed for the emergency department and ICU. All patients with a diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock were included in the protocol. METHODS: Data was collected prospectively with regards to process of care. Mortality data was collected retrospectively. FINDINGS: Early trends show improvement in outcomes for patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Results from third quarter of 2008 are: A 38% reduction in risk-adjusted mortality for sepsis in 2008 over 2007. There was a reduction in raw mortality of 57% despite a 24% increase in appropriately recognizing principle (admitting) diagnosis of Sepsis. This equates to 31 LIVES SAVED in 2008. Patients with specified "goals met" at 6 hours increased from 33% to 81%. CONCLUSIONS: Six and 24 hour bundled sepsis orders improve process of care and in-hospital mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Administrative support.tcam collaboration and structured process can lead to decreased mortality from sepsis.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:21Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS as Interal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systemsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPortland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS as Internal Consultant: Influencing Local to Global Systems, held March 3 - 6, Portland, Oregon, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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