2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164132
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Medication Calculation Skills of Nurses and Nursing Students
Author(s):
Harne-Britner, Sarah
Author Details:
Sarah Harne-Britner, RN, MSN, CCRN, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose/Objectives: This collaborative research study examined medication calculation skills of nurses and students in the practice and academic settings. The purposes of the study were to 1) assess the medication calculation skills of practicing nurses and senior baccalaureate students and 2) test the effectiveness of a teaching strategy to improve computational skills. Significance: The Clinical Nurse Specialist has a key responsibility to assess and monitor the practice of safe medication administration. The National Coordinating Council for Medication Errors Reporting and Prevention (NCC-MERP) found that 7% of reported medication errors were related to miscalculation (Thomas, Holquist & Philips, 2001). Previous research on the medication calculation skills of practicing nurses showed that the majority of nurses were unable to calculate medications at a 90% level of proficiency (Ashby, 1997; Bindler & Bayne, 1991; Bayne & Bindler, 1988). Design/Methods: The CNS collaborated with the Chair of the Department of Nursing at a local college, staff nurses and nursing students to design and implement the study. A pre-test/post-test design was used. A convenience sample of 21 practicing nurses and 32 senior nursing students participated in the study. Subjects completed a demographic questionnaire and medication calculation pre-test. Participants then chose one of three educational strategies to improve calculation skills: 1) classroom tutorial session, 2) self-study workbook or 3) self-study using own references. A medication calculation post-test was administered four weeks later. Findings: The mean RN pre-test score was 77.3 and the mean post-test score was 93. The mean student pre-test score was 79.5 and the mean post-test score was 86.9. Both groups improved with all of the interventions however, the increases weren't statistically significant (p < .05). Conclusions: Post-score trends in both groups support the use of the three educational strategies to improve medication calculation skills. Implications for Practice: The Clinical Nurse Specialist is working with the Professional Development Council and Clinical Education Committee to implement a medication calculation test for all new nurses. The medication calculation pre-test/post-test and education strategies will be used as a standardized remediation plan for nurses with poor calculation skills. The academic setting is reviewing results with the Curriculum Committee and is going to incorporate more time for classroom instruction and practice of medication calculations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Medication Calculation Skills of Nurses and Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarne-Britner, Sarahen_US
dc.author.detailsSarah Harne-Britner, RN, MSN, CCRN, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164132-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Objectives: This collaborative research study examined medication calculation skills of nurses and students in the practice and academic settings. The purposes of the study were to 1) assess the medication calculation skills of practicing nurses and senior baccalaureate students and 2) test the effectiveness of a teaching strategy to improve computational skills. Significance: The Clinical Nurse Specialist has a key responsibility to assess and monitor the practice of safe medication administration. The National Coordinating Council for Medication Errors Reporting and Prevention (NCC-MERP) found that 7% of reported medication errors were related to miscalculation (Thomas, Holquist & Philips, 2001). Previous research on the medication calculation skills of practicing nurses showed that the majority of nurses were unable to calculate medications at a 90% level of proficiency (Ashby, 1997; Bindler & Bayne, 1991; Bayne & Bindler, 1988). Design/Methods: The CNS collaborated with the Chair of the Department of Nursing at a local college, staff nurses and nursing students to design and implement the study. A pre-test/post-test design was used. A convenience sample of 21 practicing nurses and 32 senior nursing students participated in the study. Subjects completed a demographic questionnaire and medication calculation pre-test. Participants then chose one of three educational strategies to improve calculation skills: 1) classroom tutorial session, 2) self-study workbook or 3) self-study using own references. A medication calculation post-test was administered four weeks later. Findings: The mean RN pre-test score was 77.3 and the mean post-test score was 93. The mean student pre-test score was 79.5 and the mean post-test score was 86.9. Both groups improved with all of the interventions however, the increases weren't statistically significant (p < .05). Conclusions: Post-score trends in both groups support the use of the three educational strategies to improve medication calculation skills. Implications for Practice: The Clinical Nurse Specialist is working with the Professional Development Council and Clinical Education Committee to implement a medication calculation test for all new nurses. The medication calculation pre-test/post-test and education strategies will be used as a standardized remediation plan for nurses with poor calculation skills. The academic setting is reviewing results with the Curriculum Committee and is going to incorporate more time for classroom instruction and practice of medication calculations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:38Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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