2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164135
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Endotracheal Suctioning: How Deep is Too Deep?
Author(s):
Humphries, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Humphries, Texas Christian University, Harris Methodist Southwest Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: This research project explored the effectiveness of a teaching program for intensive care nurses and respiratory therapists on changing the practice of endotracheal suctioning. Endotracheal suctioning is a high-risk procedure performed on patients in intensive care or long-term ventilator care units. Nurses and respiratory therapists have traditionally been taught to advance the suction catheter until resistance is met or the patient coughs. Research has shown that passing the catheter until resistance is met increases the risk of tracheal trauma, airway edema, inflammation, tissue necrosis, and bleeding. Despite the research, the practice of deep tracheal suctioning continues to be taught and practiced. Current evidence recommends performing a minimally invasive suctioning approach, advancing the suction catheter no further than one to two centimeters past the end of the endotracheal tube, preventing the tip of the catheter from coming in contact with tracheal tissue. Description: A teaching tool was developed as a guideline to prevent passing the catheter further than necessary. The staff was presented with an in-service addressing the risks of endotracheal suctioning and how to suction using a minimally invasive approach. A pre and post teaching questionnaire was used to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching on practice change. Evaluation and Outcomes: The findings support Roger's stages of knowledge dissemination with the majority (82%) of nurses and respiratory therapists readily adopting the changes in endotracheal suctioning and putting the new technique into practice. Furthermore, this research project opened up the opportunity to purchase marked suction catheters for staff to use, which further supports the staff's ability to practice minimally invasive suctioning.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEndotracheal Suctioning: How Deep is Too Deep?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHumphries, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Humphries, Texas Christian University, Harris Methodist Southwest Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164135-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This research project explored the effectiveness of a teaching program for intensive care nurses and respiratory therapists on changing the practice of endotracheal suctioning. Endotracheal suctioning is a high-risk procedure performed on patients in intensive care or long-term ventilator care units. Nurses and respiratory therapists have traditionally been taught to advance the suction catheter until resistance is met or the patient coughs. Research has shown that passing the catheter until resistance is met increases the risk of tracheal trauma, airway edema, inflammation, tissue necrosis, and bleeding. Despite the research, the practice of deep tracheal suctioning continues to be taught and practiced. Current evidence recommends performing a minimally invasive suctioning approach, advancing the suction catheter no further than one to two centimeters past the end of the endotracheal tube, preventing the tip of the catheter from coming in contact with tracheal tissue. Description: A teaching tool was developed as a guideline to prevent passing the catheter further than necessary. The staff was presented with an in-service addressing the risks of endotracheal suctioning and how to suction using a minimally invasive approach. A pre and post teaching questionnaire was used to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching on practice change. Evaluation and Outcomes: The findings support Roger's stages of knowledge dissemination with the majority (82%) of nurses and respiratory therapists readily adopting the changes in endotracheal suctioning and putting the new technique into practice. Furthermore, this research project opened up the opportunity to purchase marked suction catheters for staff to use, which further supports the staff's ability to practice minimally invasive suctioning.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:41Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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