Increasing Clinical Excellence: The Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Nurse Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164136
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Increasing Clinical Excellence: The Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Nurse Model
Author(s):
Hydo, Beverly; Harris, Karen
Author Details:
Beverly Hydo, MSN, APRN, BC, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Karen Harris, RNC, MSN, WHNP
Abstract:
Problem: Our facility has a philosophy of nursing, a document with many words that most nurses are not familiar with and which does not appear to guide practice. Purpose: The purpose was to define what it means to be a professional nurse at our institution. The development of a framework enables the nurse to articulate the facets of nursing to peers and other health care providers as well as the community. Research has shown that a well-developed professional self-concept can positively affect the delivery of care Description of the Project: A committee of clinical nurse specialists and managers convened to determine a framework to serve as a model for nurses to clearly articulate their role. It was thought that a graphic representation of the facets of the professional nurse would have more of an impact than words on paper. Review of literature, hospital standards, and brainstorming assisted the committee to delineate the facets of nursing to include in the model. Methods: The concepts were presented to the Professional Nurse Council, other managers and clinical nurse specialists to validate the model and seek broad support. It was decided that a survey should be conducted to ask nurses in the organization what they thought it meant to be a nurse. Through the survey process, nurses assisted the committee in ensuring that all elements of professionalism were covered in the model. Pictures of staff nurses were taken and life-size displays were used to collect the entries. Another method of implementation included the development of a 30x30 game board of the model with a spinner in the middle. This was utilized at staff meetings as well as during nurse's week to elicit discussion with nurses about the facets of nursing on their units. Crossword puzzles and word searches were also distributed and prizes awarded from a drawing of the returned puzzles. The model has also been integrated into orientation by the clinical nurse specialists. By including a presentation in orientation, new nursing staff are exposed to the tone of professionalism. Outcomes and Evaluation of Practice Change: A questionnaire with a Likert scale was developed by the committee to evaluate the nurses' perception of the model in their work environment. The initial survey will be repeated in 18 months to fully evaluate the impact of the model. Initial results reveal findings consistent with previous surveys. Opportunities for improvement include professional relationships with physicians and teamwork. Initial implementation efforts have been successful, and positive comments from many staff, clinical nurse specialists, and managers have been noted. Implications: The findings from the research, as well as the model itself, will guide the growth of clinical excellence in nursing staff. These facets can serve as a basis for future evaluations on a managerial level, and also as a foundation for clinical nurse specialists to utilize for continued professional development with staff during rounds and in-services.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncreasing Clinical Excellence: The Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Nurse Modelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHydo, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsBeverly Hydo, MSN, APRN, BC, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Karen Harris, RNC, MSN, WHNPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164136-
dc.description.abstractProblem: Our facility has a philosophy of nursing, a document with many words that most nurses are not familiar with and which does not appear to guide practice. Purpose: The purpose was to define what it means to be a professional nurse at our institution. The development of a framework enables the nurse to articulate the facets of nursing to peers and other health care providers as well as the community. Research has shown that a well-developed professional self-concept can positively affect the delivery of care Description of the Project: A committee of clinical nurse specialists and managers convened to determine a framework to serve as a model for nurses to clearly articulate their role. It was thought that a graphic representation of the facets of the professional nurse would have more of an impact than words on paper. Review of literature, hospital standards, and brainstorming assisted the committee to delineate the facets of nursing to include in the model. Methods: The concepts were presented to the Professional Nurse Council, other managers and clinical nurse specialists to validate the model and seek broad support. It was decided that a survey should be conducted to ask nurses in the organization what they thought it meant to be a nurse. Through the survey process, nurses assisted the committee in ensuring that all elements of professionalism were covered in the model. Pictures of staff nurses were taken and life-size displays were used to collect the entries. Another method of implementation included the development of a 30x30 game board of the model with a spinner in the middle. This was utilized at staff meetings as well as during nurse's week to elicit discussion with nurses about the facets of nursing on their units. Crossword puzzles and word searches were also distributed and prizes awarded from a drawing of the returned puzzles. The model has also been integrated into orientation by the clinical nurse specialists. By including a presentation in orientation, new nursing staff are exposed to the tone of professionalism. Outcomes and Evaluation of Practice Change: A questionnaire with a Likert scale was developed by the committee to evaluate the nurses' perception of the model in their work environment. The initial survey will be repeated in 18 months to fully evaluate the impact of the model. Initial results reveal findings consistent with previous surveys. Opportunities for improvement include professional relationships with physicians and teamwork. Initial implementation efforts have been successful, and positive comments from many staff, clinical nurse specialists, and managers have been noted. Implications: The findings from the research, as well as the model itself, will guide the growth of clinical excellence in nursing staff. These facets can serve as a basis for future evaluations on a managerial level, and also as a foundation for clinical nurse specialists to utilize for continued professional development with staff during rounds and in-services.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:42Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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