2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164141
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ductoscopy Screening In The High Risk Breast Cancer Population
Author(s):
Lacovara, Jane E.; Arzouman, Jill
Author Details:
Jane E. Lacovara, RN, BC, MSN, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Jill Arzouman, RN-APRN, MS, CNS
Abstract:
Mammograms are considered the gold standard for screening the general population of women over the age of 40 for breast cancer. When a woman is younger, or has particularly dense breast tissue, the sonogram may be the first diagnostic tool used to evaluate specific breast abnormalities. When neither tool is suitable an MRI is used to help locate and evaluate abnormalities. However, additional screening considerations may be necessary for a patient who has a known familial genetic mutation but no active disease. For example, the BRCA? or BRCA2 mutation, if inherited, may place the patient at an 87% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. The breast cancer associated with this mutation also tends to occur at a much younger age (under 50) and many times in the 30s. Ductoscopy is the use of a very thin fiberoptic scope inserted into a fluid producing breast duct to look for abnormalities. The scope is threaded through the milk ducts inside the breast. An attached camera and imaging system magnify the video images, and display these pictures on a video screen allowing visualization inside the duct. During the ductoscopy procedure, intraductal biopsies may be retrieved and sent off for analysis. In addition, the general health of the duct may be observed, noting any inflammatory or cytological changes. It is believed that up to 80% of breast cancers originate within the breast duct. Mammograms and MRIs rarely identify tumors until they are at least 5mm in size. Most often, tumors have grown for several years (up to 10) before they are large enough to be noted on the mammogram. The ductoscopy can identify tumors at a much smaller stage hopefully decreasing the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer. Clinical nurse specialists interested in cancer prevention and/or genetic counseling should be aware of this newly emerging technological screening option.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDuctoscopy Screening In The High Risk Breast Cancer Populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLacovara, Jane E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorArzouman, Jillen_US
dc.author.detailsJane E. Lacovara, RN, BC, MSN, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Jill Arzouman, RN-APRN, MS, CNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164141-
dc.description.abstractMammograms are considered the gold standard for screening the general population of women over the age of 40 for breast cancer. When a woman is younger, or has particularly dense breast tissue, the sonogram may be the first diagnostic tool used to evaluate specific breast abnormalities. When neither tool is suitable an MRI is used to help locate and evaluate abnormalities. However, additional screening considerations may be necessary for a patient who has a known familial genetic mutation but no active disease. For example, the BRCA? or BRCA2 mutation, if inherited, may place the patient at an 87% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. The breast cancer associated with this mutation also tends to occur at a much younger age (under 50) and many times in the 30s. Ductoscopy is the use of a very thin fiberoptic scope inserted into a fluid producing breast duct to look for abnormalities. The scope is threaded through the milk ducts inside the breast. An attached camera and imaging system magnify the video images, and display these pictures on a video screen allowing visualization inside the duct. During the ductoscopy procedure, intraductal biopsies may be retrieved and sent off for analysis. In addition, the general health of the duct may be observed, noting any inflammatory or cytological changes. It is believed that up to 80% of breast cancers originate within the breast duct. Mammograms and MRIs rarely identify tumors until they are at least 5mm in size. Most often, tumors have grown for several years (up to 10) before they are large enough to be noted on the mammogram. The ductoscopy can identify tumors at a much smaller stage hopefully decreasing the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer. Clinical nurse specialists interested in cancer prevention and/or genetic counseling should be aware of this newly emerging technological screening option.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:48Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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